Howe”s words give the impression of echoing another, hidden poetry of which we catch only fragments, like an opera sung in another room—except that the other room is death, or history, or the ineffable.

—Geoffrey O’Brien, The Village Voice

The Quarry

Nonfiction by Susan Howe

A powerful selection of Susan Howe’s previously uncollected essays, The Quarry moves backward chronologically, from her brand-new “Vagrancy in the Park” (about Wallace Stevens) through such essential texts as “The Disappearance Approach,” “Personal Narrative,” “Sorting Facts,” “Frame Structures,” and “Where Should the Commander Be,” and ending with her seminal early criticism, “The End of Art.” The essays of The Quarry map the intellectual territory of one of America’s most important and vital avant-garde poets.

Your Independent Bookstore Barnes & Noble

Paperback (published December 7, 2015)

ISBN
9780811222464
Price US
16.95
Price CN
19.95
Trim Size
5 x 8
Page Count
224

Ebook (published December 7, 2015)

ISBN
9780811224543

Susan Howe

American poet and essayist

Howe”s words give the impression of echoing another, hidden poetry of which we catch only fragments, like an opera sung in another room—except that the other room is death, or history, or the ineffable.

—Geoffrey O’Brien, The Village Voice

Marvelous with a visionary apprehension of what is to come, telepathic communication with past poetries, histories, lives, material and spiritual realities.

—Jonathan Creasy, The Los Angeles Review of Books

Howe’s brilliant, idiosyncratic essay is—like much of her work—a combination of fierce rigor and deep generosity. Howe unlocks.

—Ben Lerner

Howe’s abiding concern with our cultural and intellectual inheritance is revolutionary and redemptive. Her work is a force for social change.

—W. Scott Howard, Talisman

The end result is something of a photographic negative: history refreshed and personalized by virtue of its own estrangement.

—Dustin Illingworth, 3:AM

Howe is one of America’s preeminent experimental poets.

Booklist

Reaching back through Hawthorne, Dickinson and beyond, Susan Howe taps a stream of American thinking that is as clear and fresh as a draught of well water. She is our conscience, our voice, our song.

—John Ashbery

She manages to balance the most cerebral passages with a sharp eye for just the right detail.

Publishers Weekly

Universally recognized as a major poet, Susan Howe should also be known as the most innovative, the most thrilling essayist writing today.

—Eliot Weinberger

No other poet now writing has Howe’s power to bring together narrative and lyric, scholarship and historical speculation, found text and pure invention.

—Marjorie Perloff

Howe’s brilliant, idiosyncratic essay is—like much of her work—a combination of fierce rigor and deep generosity. Howe unlocks.

—Ben Lerner