An important voice in contemporary literature, a signal inheritor of an American poetic tradition. Like Dickinson, her Massachusetts muse, Howe turns the English of a self steeped in books such that every word, as in Scripture, glows with an almost moral quality.

Artforum

Susan Howe’s newest book of poetry is a revelation as well as a mystery.

That This

Poetry by Susan Howe

Your Independent Bookstore Barnes & Noble

Paperback (published December 31, 2010)

ISBN
9780811219181
Price US
16.95
Price CN
20
Page Count
112

Ebook (published December 31, 2010)

ISBN
9780811223775
Page Count
112

Susan Howe

American poet and essayist

An important voice in contemporary literature, a signal inheritor of an American poetic tradition. Like Dickinson, her Massachusetts muse, Howe turns the English of a self steeped in books such that every word, as in Scripture, glows with an almost moral quality.

Artforum

For nearly thirty years, Howe has occupied a particular and invaluable place in American poetry. She’s a rigorously skeptical and a profoundly visionary poet, a writer whose demystifying intelligence is matched by a passionate embrace of poetry’s rejuvenating power.

—John Palattella, The Boston Review

Monomania has its rewards – an incantatory power that shines through. Howe’s images, being historical as well as biographical, have the eerie shading of ghosts half-believed in, giving a surreal, dreamlike atmosphere reminiscent of Borges at his sharpest.

Kirkus Reviews

The still-new century’s finest metaphysical poet.

The Village Voice

An important voice in contemporary literature, a signal inheritor of an American poetic tradition. Like Dickinson, her Massachusetts muse, Howe turns the English of a self steeped in books such that every word, as in Scripture, glows with an almost moral quality.

Artforum

For nearly thirty years, Howe has occupied a particular and invaluable place in American poetry. She’s a rigorously skeptical and a profoundly visionary poet, a writer whose demystifying intelligence is matched by a passionate embrace of poetry’s rejuvenating power.

—John Palattella, Boston Review