As a poet and a critic she articulates precisely those soundings of uncertainty, those zones of failed or impaired utterance that constitute the literary history of America”s uneasy commerce with the world.

—Richard Sieburth, Times Literary Supplement

Finally, My Emily Dickinson, Susan Howe’s singular and unforgettable 1985 creative study, is available as a New Directions paperbook

My Emily Dickinson

Nonfiction by Susan Howe

With a contribution by Eliot Weinberger

For Wallace Stevens, “Poetry is the scholar’s art.” Susan Howe—taking the poet-scholar-critics Charles Olson, H.D., and William Carlos Williams (among others) as her guides—embodies that art in her 1985 My Emily Dickinson (winner of the Before Columbus Foundation Book Award). Howe shows ways in which earlier scholarship had shortened Dickinson’s intellectual reach by ignoring the use to which she put her wide reading. Giving close attention to the well-known poem, “My Life had stood—a Loaded Gun,” Home tracks Dickens, Browning, Emily Brontë, Shakespeare, and Spenser, as well as local Connecticut River Valley histories, Puritan sermons, captivity narratives, and the popular culture of the day. “Dickinson’s life was language and a lexicon her landscape. Forcing, abbreviating, pushing, padding, subtracting, riddling, interrogating, re-writing, she pulled text from text….”

Your Independent Bookstore Barnes & Noble

Paperback (published November 1, 2007)

ISBN
9780811216838
Price US
15.95
Price CN
18
Trim Size
6x9
Page Count
160

Ebook (published November 1, 2007)

ISBN
9780811223348
Page Count
160

Susan Howe

American poet and essayist

As a poet and a critic she articulates precisely those soundings of uncertainty, those zones of failed or impaired utterance that constitute the literary history of America”s uneasy commerce with the world.

—Richard Sieburth, Times Literary Supplement

One of our seminal works of creative scholarship.

—Michael Palmer

As a poet and a critic she articulates precisely those soundings of uncertainty, those zones of failed or impaired utterance that constitute the literary history of America’s uneasy commerce with the word.

—Richard Sieburth, Times Literary Supplement

Howe’s brilliant, idiosyncratic essay is—like much of her work—a combination of fierce rigor and deep generosity. Howe unlocks.

—Ben Lerner

One of our seminal works of creative scholarship.

—Michael Palmer