Susan Howe

Debths

Poetry by Susan Howe

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The Quarry

Nonfiction by Susan Howe

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The Birth-mark

Nonfiction by Susan Howe

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Spontaneous Particulars

by Susan Howe

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Poetry Pamphlets 1–4

Poetry by Eliot WeinbergerSusan HoweLydia DavisSylvia LegrisBernadette Mayer

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Sorting Facts, or Nineteen Ways of Looking at Marker

by Susan Howe

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That This

Poetry by Susan Howe

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My Emily Dickinson

Nonfiction by Susan Howe

With a contribution by Eliot Weinberger

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Souls Of The Labadie Tract

Poetry by Susan Howe

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The Midnight

Poetry by Susan Howe

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The Europe Of Trusts

Poetry by Susan Howe

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Pierce-Arrow

Poetry by Susan Howe

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Frame Structures

Poetry by Susan Howe

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The Nonconformist’s Memorial

Poetry by Susan Howe

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The Gorgeous Nothings

Poetry by Emily Dickinson

Edited by Marta WernerJen Bervin

With a contribution by Susan Howe

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Howe creates a finely woven exploration of narrative and transmission anchored in the American past and future. A fascinating look at art across time that can be visited many times without dulling.

Chicago Review of Books

Debths is a profound synthesis of Howe’s obsessions, methods, and concerns as a writer… an enactment of the eternally present and perpetually surprising conversation between poet and reader. Howe’s writing is as vital now as it has ever been.

—Stephen Collis, Boston Review

A finely woven exploration of narrative and transmission anchored in the American past and future.

—Sarah Huener, Chicago Review of Books

As fascinating and compelling as any writer we have.

The Harvard Review

Invaluable—a rigorously skeptical and a profoundly visionary poet, a writer whose demystifying intelligence is matched by a passionate embrace of poetry’s rejuvenating power.

—John Palattella, The Boston Review

A fresh occasion not just to celebrate Howe, who turned seventy-eight this year, but also to read her anew, which is the more formidable and ultimately more rewarding charge. Wildly and wantonly she is bringing everything to the table, including poetry, history, research, politics, autobiography, imagination, obsession and love, all the while demonstrating how strange, puzzling, and untamed writing and thinking can be.

—Maggie Nelson, Artforum

The Birth-Mark awakened me to the possibility of writing criticism wildly and wantonly, of bringing everything to the table, including history, research, politics, autobiography, imagination, obsession, and love.

—Maggie Nelson, Artforum

Howe’s abiding concern with our cultural and intellectual inheritance is revolutionary and redemptive. Her work is a force for social change.

—W. Scott Howard, Talisman

The end result is something of a photographic negative: history refreshed and personalized by virtue of its own estrangement.

—Dustin Illingworth, 3:AM

Howe is one of America’s preeminent experimental poets.

Booklist

Reaching back through Hawthorne, Dickinson and beyond, Susan Howe taps a stream of American thinking that is as clear and fresh as a draught of well water. She is our conscience, our voice, our song.

—John Ashbery

She manages to balance the most cerebral passages with a sharp eye for just the right detail.

Publishers Weekly

Invaluable….A reconnaissance mission in language and history.

—John Palattella, The Boston Review

An astonishing work re-presenting the American past, its history, literature, texts, and critics. At once gnomic and lucid, grave and scintillating—passionate [with] fierce originality.

—Rachel Blau DuPlessis

As a poet and a critic she articulates precisely those soundings of uncertainty, those zones of failed or impaired utterance that constitute the literary history of America’s uneasy commerce with the word.

—Richard Sieburth, Times Literary Supplement

Monomania has its rewards – an incantatory power that shines through. Howe’s images, being historical as well as biographical, have the eerie shading of ghosts half-believed in, giving a surreal, dreamlike atmosphere reminiscent of Borges at his sharpest.

Kirkus Reviews

Universally recognized as a major poet, Susan Howe should also be known as the most innovative, the most thrilling essayist writing today.

—Eliot Weinberger

No other poet now writing has Howe’s power to bring together narrative and lyric, scholarship and historical speculation, found text and pure invention.

—Marjorie Perloff

Howe’s brilliant, idiosyncratic essay is—like much of her work—a combination of fierce rigor and deep generosity. Howe unlocks.

—Ben Lerner

Howe unlocks.

—Ben Lerner

The still-new century’s finest metaphysical poet.

The Village Voice

A haunter of archives, for whom manuscripts and marginalia and indexes are muses, Susan Howe often works with the materials she finds there. The result may be a textual collage or a ground-breaking work of criticism, or both.

The Paris Review

One of the preeminent poets of her generation, Susan Howe is known for innovative verse that crosses genres and disciplines in its theoretical underpinnings and approach to history.

The Poetry Foundation

Howe’s images, being historical as well as biographical, have the eerie shadowing of ghosts half-believed in, giving … a surreal, dream-like atmosphere reminiscent of Borges at his sharpest.

Kirkus Reviews

An important voice in contemporary literature, a signal inheritor of an American poetic tradition. Like Dickinson, her Massachusetts muse, Howe turns the English of a self steeped in books such that every word, as in Scripture, glows with an almost moral quality.

Artforum

For those less interested in a broad, synthetic argument about Marker’s oeuvre and more interested in how writing might pay homage to the experience of watching his films and the fact of his loss, Howe’s essay will be a welcome contribution to a growing corpus of Markeriana.

—Rebecca Ariel Porte, Los Angeles Review of Books

For nearly thirty years Howe has occupied a particular and invaluable place in American poetry. She is a rigorously skeptical and a profoundly visionary poet, a writer whose demystifying talent is matched by a passionate embrace of poetry’s rejuvinating power.

—John Palattella, The Boston Review

Susan Howe’s imaginative and irresistible re-creation of’ the hidden life of the philosopher Charles Sanders Peirce, his relationship with the mysterious ‘gypsy’ wife Juliette, his worldly failures and spiritual triumphs, has the intensity of a Jamesian novel in which the figure in the carpet—in this case a figure comprised of Peirce’s astonishing visual texts, scenes from the Iliad, from the poems of Swinburne and Meredith, and finally the Tristan and Iseult legend—crystallize in an overarching vision of the poet’s own desire—and failure—to achieve oneness, union with another self. Part narrative, part lyric, this profound memory poem conveys, as do few poems of our time, what Howe refers to as ‘Mind’s trajected light.’

—Marjorie Perloff
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