A Hungarian modernist whose sentences wind and unwind and rewind, creating what one translator described as ‘a slow lava-flow of narrative, a vast black river of type.’ A fitting winner of the 2015 Man Booker International prize.

The Economist

The latest novel from “the contemporary Hungarian master of the apocalypse” (Susan Sontag)

Seiobo There Below

Fiction by László Krasznahorkai

Translated by Ottilie Mulzet

Your Independent Bookstore Barnes & Noble

Paperback (published September 24, 2013)

ISBN
9780811219679
Price US
16.95
Price CN
18
Page Count
448

Ebook (published September 24, 2013)

ISBN
9780811221191

A Hungarian modernist whose sentences wind and unwind and rewind, creating what one translator described as ‘a slow lava-flow of narrative, a vast black river of type.’ A fitting winner of the 2015 Man Booker International prize.

The Economist

Krasznahorkai, the poet of the Apocalypse, stands alone relentlessly, if gleefully, offering wonders.

—Eileen Battersby, The Irish Times

László Krasznahorkai has given us a work that shimmers under a prism of hidden meanings. Our task is to connect the dots, experience the mystery of the text, and embrace moments of bewilderment with patience, openness, and preparation for a deeply meaningful encounter.

—Stephanie Newman, The Millions

Finishing Seiobo There Below is like walking out of a cathedral: its parting gift is a ringing in the ears. This book is magnificent and will outlive interpretation.

—Madeleine LaRue, The Coffin Factory

Tinged both with sadness and an anxiety about the capability of language, this brilliantly ambitious novel, like the tragic poetry of one of its characters, becomes a ‘ravishing cadenza.

Publishers Weekly

Krasznahorkai is an expert with the complexity of human obsessions. Each of his books feel like an event, a revelation, and Seiobo There Below is no different.

The Daily Beast

Seiobo There Below places upon us readers the same demands of all great art, and allows us to grasp a vision of painstaking beauty if we can slow ourselves down to savor it.

NPR Books