Thought-provoking and meditative…From Russian cosmonauts to despairing bishops to beleaguered bankers, the threads of forsaking and being forsaken weave like a nervous system through dense, philosophical prose.

Harper’s Bazaar

A magnificent new collection of stories by “the contemporary Hungarian master of apocalypse” (Susan Sontag)

Available November 28, 2017

The World Goes On

Fiction by László Krasznahorkai

Translated by John BatkiOttilie MulzetGeorge Szirtes

Your Independent Bookstore Barnes & Noble

Clothbound (published November 28, 2017)

ISBN
9780811224192
Price US
27.95
Price CN
36.95
Trim Size
5x8
Page Count
288

Ebook (published November 28, 2017)

ISBN
9780811224208

Thought-provoking and meditative…From Russian cosmonauts to despairing bishops to beleaguered bankers, the threads of forsaking and being forsaken weave like a nervous system through dense, philosophical prose.

Harper’s Bazaar

Our current condition of displacement, says László Krasznahorkai in The World Goes On, cannot be told; only with great difficulty can language be budged out of endless spirallings of frustration. But then the collection goes on to offer stories of journeys that, whether undertaken or thwarted, arrive at transcendence. At the end there is only one way to go, in what has to be the most powerful page written so far this century.

—Paul Griffiths, TLS

A treasure trove of 21 idiosyncratic stories. Endlessly intriguing.

BBC

Russian cosmonauts, a waterfall-obsessed interpreter in Shanghai teetering on the edge of sanity, and a Portuguese child laborer who escapes his toils by wandering into an alternate reality … _The World Goes On_ [is] a philosophically-charged new collection of stories about characters that are being pushed (figuratively or literally) to the edges of the world.

Los Angeles Magazine

Sly and elegant

—Saul Anton, 4Columns

A masterpiece of invention

The Guardian

Krasznahorkai questions language, history, and what we take to be facts, all the while rocketing from one corner of the world to the next, from Budapest to Varanasi to Okinawa…

Kirkus Review