Our current condition of displacement, says László Krasznahorkai in The World Goes On, cannot be told; only with great difficulty can language be budged out of endless spirallings of frustration. But then the collection goes on to offer stories of journeys that, whether undertaken or thwarted, arrive at transcendence. At the end there is only one way to go, in what has to be the most powerful page written so far this century.

Paul Griffiths, TLS

Now in paperback, a transcendent and wide-ranging collection of stories by László Krasznahorkai

Available Apr, 02 2024

The World Goes On

Fictionby László Krasznahorkai

Translated from Hungarian by George Szirtes, Ottilie Mulzet and John Batki

In The World Goes On, a narrator first speaks directly, then narrates a number of unforgettable stories, and then bids farewell (“Here I would leave this earth and these stars, because I would take nothing with me”). As László Krasznahorkai himself explains: “Each text is about drawing our attention away from this world, speeding our body toward annihilation, and immersing ourselves in a current of thought or a narrative...” A Hungarian interpreter obsessed with waterfalls, at the edge of the abyss in his own mind, wanders the chaotic streets of Shanghai. A traveler, reeling from the sights and sounds of Varanasi, India, encounters a giant of a man on the banks of the Ganges ranting on and on about the nature of a single drop of water. A child laborer in a Portuguese marble quarry wanders off from work one day into a surreal realm utterly alien from his daily toils. “The excitement of his writing,” Adam Thirlwell proclaimed in The New York Review of Books, “is that he has come up with his own original forms—there is nothing else like it in contemporary literature.”

Paperback(published Apr, 02 2024)

ISBN
9780811237512
Price US
17.95
Trim Size
5x8
Page Count
288pp

Ebook

ISBN
9780811224208

Our current condition of displacement, says László Krasznahorkai in The World Goes On, cannot be told; only with great difficulty can language be budged out of endless spirallings of frustration. But then the collection goes on to offer stories of journeys that, whether undertaken or thwarted, arrive at transcendence. At the end there is only one way to go, in what has to be the most powerful page written so far this century.

Paul Griffiths, TLS

One begins a Krasznahorkai story like a free diver, with a deep inhalation before plunging in. His fiction is not faithful to literary convention, but it is faithful to life.

Nathaniel Rich, The Atlantic