If she played with the superficial truth, it was in service, she believed, of exposing one deeper, of passing readers a brief-lit lantern for the moonless dark of ourselves, even if that light revealed, sometimes, more contradiction, more chaos, more flittering soul-storm. Her crônicas blurred lines between genre—some are like little Zen koans, some lyrical reminiscences, while others, like “Return to Nature,” are harder to categorize, reading like parables or flash fiction. At times, they also muddied demarcations between nonfiction and fiction, resurrecting the oldest question of form: Where does nonfiction truly end and fiction begin, and what do we do with texts where we do not know the answer?

The Paris Review

A revelation for readers of Clarice Lispector’s novels and stories, Selected Crônicas presents an entirely new side of Brazil’s greatest twentieth-century writer.

Available November 1, 1996

Selected Cronicas

Fiction by Clarice Lispector

The chronicle, a literary genre peculiar to the Brazilian press, allows poets and novelists to address a wide readership on any theme they like. Lispector’s Saturday column from 1967 to 1973 in Rio’s leading newspaper, the Jornal do Brasil, was even by Brazilian standards extraordinarily free-ranging and intimate—astonishingly so to readers of US newspapers. The 156 crônicas collected here (variously taking the form of serialized stories, essays, aphorisms, conversations with taxi drivers, random thoughts, introspective revelations, memories) are endlessly delightful. Her insights make one sit up and think, whether about pets or children or society women or love or the business of writing.

Your Independent Bookstore Barnes & Noble

Paperback (published November 1, 1996)

ISBN
9780811213400
Price US
14.95
Trim Size
5x8
Page Count
296

Clarice Lispector

20th-century Brazilian writer

If she played with the superficial truth, it was in service, she believed, of exposing one deeper, of passing readers a brief-lit lantern for the moonless dark of ourselves, even if that light revealed, sometimes, more contradiction, more chaos, more flittering soul-storm. Her crônicas blurred lines between genre—some are like little Zen koans, some lyrical reminiscences, while others, like “Return to Nature,” are harder to categorize, reading like parables or flash fiction. At times, they also muddied demarcations between nonfiction and fiction, resurrecting the oldest question of form: Where does nonfiction truly end and fiction begin, and what do we do with texts where we do not know the answer?

The Paris Review

One might have thought that so stern a ‘new novelist’ would scorn the chatty style required. Far from it: Lispector discovered her own extraordinary idiom–intimate, revelatory, mystificatory. This flirtation with her readers was a triumphant metamorphosis for the avant-garde author.

Times Literary Supplement