Tennessee Williams

by Tennessee Williams

Moise and the World of Reason

Now the Cats with Jeweled Claws

The Roman Spring of Mrs. Stone

Orpheus Descending & Suddenly Last Summer

The Glass Menagerie (Centennial Edition)

The Magic Tower And Other One-Act Plays

The Rose Tattoo

Tales of Desire

The Night of the Iguana

New Selected Essays: Where I Live

Sweet Bird Of Youth

Camino Real

A House Not Meant To Stand

The Traveling Companion & Other Plays

Memoirs

The Selected Letters of Tennessee Williams Vol. II: 1946-1957

The Collected Poems Of Tennessee Williams

Mister Paradise & Other One Act Plays

A Streetcar Named Desire

Cat on a Hot Tin Roof

Candles To The Sun

The Selected Letters of Tennessee Williams Vol. I: 1920-1945

Fugitive Kind

The Theatre Of Tennessee Williams, Vol. VIII

Eight Mortal Ladies Possessed

Small Craft Warnings

Vieux Carre

Stairs To The Roof

Spring Storm

The Glass Menagerie

Not About Nightingales

The Notebook Of Trigorin

Something Cloudy Something Clear

The Theatre Of Tennessee Williams, Vol. VII

The Collected Stories of Tennessee Williams

The Theatre Of Tennessee Williams, Vol. IV

The Theatre Of Tennessee Williams, Vol. VI

The Theatre Of Tennessee Williams, Vol. III

Baby Doll & Tiger Tail

The Theatre Of Tennessee Williams, Vol. II

The Theatre Of Tennessee Williams, Vol. V

The Theatre Of Tennessee Williams, Vol. I

The Red Devil Battery Sign

Stopped Rocking And Other Screenplays

Clothes For A Summer Hotel

Lovely Sunday For Creve Coeur

The Two Character Play

Dragon Country

One Arm & Other Stories

Hard Candy

27 Wagons Full of Cotton

In The Winter Of Cities

Tennessee Williams

Moise and the World of Reason

Fiction by Tennessee Williams

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Now the Cats with Jeweled Claws

Theater by Tennessee Williams

Edited by Thomas Keith

With a contribution by Thomas Keith

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The Roman Spring of Mrs. Stone

Fiction by Tennessee Williams

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Orpheus Descending & Suddenly Last Summer

Theater by Tennessee Williams

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The Glass Menagerie (Centennial Edition)

Theater by Tennessee Williams

With a contribution by Tony Kushner

More Information

The Magic Tower And Other One-Act Plays

Theater by Tennessee Williams

Edited by Thomas Keith

With a contribution by Terrence McNally

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The Rose Tattoo

Theater by Tennessee Williams

With a contribution by John Patrick Shanley

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Tales of Desire

Fiction by Tennessee Williams

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The Night of the Iguana

Theater by Tennessee Williams

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New Selected Essays: Where I Live

Nonfiction by Tennessee Williams

With a contribution by John Lahr

More Information

Sweet Bird Of Youth

Theater by Tennessee Williams

With a contribution by Lanford Wilson

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Camino Real

Theater by Tennessee Williams

With a contribution by John Guare

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A House Not Meant To Stand

Theater by Tennessee Williams

Edited by Thomas Keith

With a contribution by Thomas Keith Gregory Mosher

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The Traveling Companion & Other Plays

Theater by Tennessee Williams

Edited by Annette J. Saddick

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Memoirs

Nonfiction by Tennessee Williams

With a contribution by John Waters

More Information

The Selected Letters of Tennessee Williams Vol. II: 1946-1957

Nonfiction by Tennessee Williams

Edited by Albert J. Devlin Nancy M. Tischler

More Information

The Collected Poems Of Tennessee Williams

Poetry by Tennessee Williams

Edited by David Roessel Nicholas Moschovakis

More Information

Mister Paradise & Other One Act Plays

Theater by Tennessee Williams

Edited by Nicholas Moschovakis David Roessel

With a contribution by Eli Wallach Anne Jackson

More Information

A Streetcar Named Desire

Theater by Tennessee Williams

More Information

Cat on a Hot Tin Roof

Theater by Tennessee Williams

More Information

Candles To The Sun

Theater by Tennessee Williams

With a contribution by William Jay Smith

More Information

The Selected Letters of Tennessee Williams Vol. I: 1920-1945

Nonfiction by Tennessee Williams

Edited by Albert J. Devlin Nancy M. Tischler

More Information

Fugitive Kind

Theater by Tennessee Williams

More Information

The Theatre Of Tennessee Williams, Vol. VIII

Theater by Tennessee Williams

More Information

Eight Mortal Ladies Possessed

Theater by Tennessee Williams

More Information

Small Craft Warnings

Theater by Tennessee Williams

More Information

Vieux Carre

Theater by Tennessee Williams

More Information

Stairs To The Roof

Theater by Tennessee Williams

More Information

Spring Storm

Theater by Tennessee Williams

More Information

The Glass Menagerie

Theater by Tennessee Williams

More Information

Not About Nightingales

Theater by Tennessee Williams

More Information

The Notebook Of Trigorin

Theater by Tennessee Williams

More Information

Something Cloudy Something Clear

Theater by Tennessee Williams

More Information

The Theatre Of Tennessee Williams, Vol. VII

Theater by Tennessee Williams

More Information

The Collected Stories of Tennessee Williams

Fiction by Tennessee Williams

More Information

The Theatre Of Tennessee Williams, Vol. IV

Theater by Tennessee Williams

More Information

The Theatre Of Tennessee Williams, Vol. VI

Theater by Tennessee Williams

More Information

The Theatre Of Tennessee Williams, Vol. III

Theater by Tennessee Williams

More Information

Baby Doll & Tiger Tail

Theater by Tennessee Williams

More Information

The Theatre Of Tennessee Williams, Vol. II

Theater by Tennessee Williams

More Information

The Theatre Of Tennessee Williams, Vol. V

Theater by Tennessee Williams

More Information

The Theatre Of Tennessee Williams, Vol. I

Theater by Tennessee Williams

More Information

The Red Devil Battery Sign

Theater by Tennessee Williams

More Information

Stopped Rocking And Other Screenplays

Theater by Tennessee Williams

More Information

Clothes For A Summer Hotel

Theater by Tennessee Williams

More Information

Lovely Sunday For Creve Coeur

Theater by Tennessee Williams

More Information

The Two Character Play

Theater by Tennessee Williams

More Information

Dragon Country

Theater by Tennessee Williams

More Information

Hard Candy

Fiction by Tennessee Williams

More Information

27 Wagons Full of Cotton

Theater by Tennessee Williams

More Information

In The Winter Of Cities

Poetry by Tennessee Williams

More Information

Actors and audiences alike remain drawn, more 70 years later, to the dark corners and sticky places that Williams so fearlessly plundered, both as a playwright and as a person.

The 11th Hour

In A Recluse and His Guest, America’s most poetic playwright brings to life an entire relationship of depth and intimacy, from the first meeting to the last, in an astonishingly short amount of time.

—Todd Stuart Phillips, One Man’s World

The Demolition Downtown wrings laughter from the plight of a couple whose lives have been ruined by a new political order bent upon demolishing, literally and otherwise, the lives of its citizens.

—Eric Marchese, Backstage, Los Angeles

Williams was always confronting the future; a shaman with a typewriter, he dug into the darkest depths of the American psyche in search of dramatic truths.

—Randy Gener, American Theatre

I do not want to reveal too many of The Strange Play’s secrets—its embrace of a whimsical, ethereal, and, yes, strange, world is most pleasing when it is a surprise to the audience.

—Bess Rowen, The Huffington Post

The fact that This Is the Peaceable Kingdom takes place in New York puts a whole different spin on the play and gives the poetry a different kind of starkness.

—Mallery Avidon, Brooklyn Rail

The Strange Play and Ivan’s Widow make for intriguing theater, both in their own right and as a part of the legacy of Tennessee Williams—a playwright who prowled the world’s dark corners long before, and long after, he shone under the bright lights of Broadway.

—Brad Rhines, The New Orleans Advocate

Steps Must Be Gentle provides a tantalizing peek into Williams’s preoccupation with death, suicide, and creativity.

—Tom Valeo, Chicago Reader

This absurdist satire introduces us to New York ladies who lunch. And yet theatergoers will still warmly recognize the unmistakable literary voice in Now the Cats with Jeweled Claws.

—Jason Zinnoman, The New York Times

From Williams, it seems, there are treasures to be plundered still.

—Laura Collins-Hughes, The New York Times

You won’t forget Now The Cats with Jeweled Claws—I’ve seen quite a few late-period Williams curios but this mesmerizing 1981 piece may be the most demented of them all.

—Elisabeth Vincentelli, New York Post

In A Recluse and His Guest, Williams skillfully breaks our hearts.

—David Clark, OUT Magazine

A Recluse and His Guest has remarkable language; indeed one listens for how the Master keeps showing up in late-career scripts.

—Hilton Als, The New Yorker

There are people who think that Camino Real was Tennessee Williams’ best play and I believe that they are right. It is a play torn out of a human soul.

—Clive Barnes, The New York Times

Williams was always confronting the future; a shaman with a typewriter, he dug into the darkest depths of the American psyche in search of dramatic truths.

—Randy Gener, American Theater Magazine

Mr. Williams is a master of the short play

—Clive Barnes, The New York Times

Now the Cats With Jeweled Claws is a loopy send-up of New York society, written in a gleefully absurdist mode.

—Bruce Weber, The New York Times

The novel bears the playwright’s familiar stamp on almost every page. And underlying the novel is Mr. Williams’s message that if people can only find a little love in the dark night—a little warmth, a little kindness, a hand extended across the chasm—they will be saved from the icy world of reason that so oppresses them

The New York Times

Lovely writing. Some of his descriptive passages unfold like dark flowers. There’s charm, grace, beauty here. Moise has the sound and feel of art.

The Washington Post

There is no such thing as ‘bad’ Tennessee Williams; only wounded, subtle, sad little songs of defeat like Moise that should jolt adventurous readers everywhere. You might laugh out loud in pleasure at this radical little novel. I sure did

—John Waters

Tennessee Williams’ best play.

The Guardian

Tennessee Williams saved my life.

—John Waters

An essential human conflict in visual terms.

The New York Times

I yearned for a bad influence and boy, was Tennessee one in the best sense of the word.

—John Waters

A raw display of private life.

The New York Times

Tennessee was a splendidly indiscreet letter-writer and as we watch the young T. L. Williams in these pages, it becomes – suddenly? – clear that his is the most distinctive, humorous,American voice since Mark Twain

—Gore Vidal

You cannot read these letters without hearing Tennessee speaking them.

—Edward Albee

There may never be a better biography of Tennessee Williams than the one he inadvertently wrote in his letters.

—David Cuthbert, The Times-Picayune

These letters present a self-portrait of a brave man, harassed by his demons, yet always – in those days, with riveting power – trying to bend them to his artistic will.

—Richard Schickel, The New York Times Book Review

Tennessee Williams made much of the atmosphere of family violence that shaped his personality; he said less about the family eloquence that shaped his prose. The Dakins, Ottes, and Williamses who made up his family tree were well-educated and well-spoken. They were talkers. Williams grew up in an environment of fluency, in which Biblical imperative, Puritan platitude, classical allusion, patrician punctilio, and Negro homily were tumbled together in a rich linguistic brew.

—John Lahr

The plays collected here all help to illuminate the work of America’s great poet-playwright.

—Kathleen Chalfant

A compact and wry political gem, The Municipal Abattoir proves (as he said himself) that Williams wasnot asleep in the ‘60s.

—Michael Kahn

Adam and Eve on a Ferry is delightfully absurd.

—John Simon, New York Magazine

Summer at the Lake bears the unmistakable hallmarks of Williams’s style: it is compassionate, vivid, lyrical and true.

The New York Times

And Tell Sad Stories of the Deaths of Queens…is nothing less than a lost miniature masterpiece.

—Jonathan Warman, HX Magazine

Mister Paradise is an x-ray look into Williams’ soul – it is acidic, sad, and most moving.

—Eli Wallach

Hilarious, horrible madness,A House Not Meant to Stand is ‘The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari’ on the Gulf Coast.

The Chicago Tribune

A House Note Meant to Stand is a ferocious scalding comedy. Tennessee Williams pushed the boundaries right up to the very end.

—John Guare

Williams’ late experiments in ordered anarchy and avant-garde European aesthetics were … very much earned, very much his distinctive own. Williams’ dramaturgy is still ahead of our time.

—Randy Gener, American Theatre Magazine

Just when I thought I was familiar with Tennessee’s stage work, here comes an entire volume of plays that’s completely new to me. What a windfall!

—Landford Wilson

I yearned for a bad influence as a boy, was Tennessee one in the best sense of the word: joyous, alarming, sexually confusing and dangerously funny.

—John Waters

Tennessee Williams was the only great playwright America ever produced. I do not think we will ever again have the sort of theater that produced dramatists like Tennessee. I doubt that we will see anything like him again.

—Gore Vidal

…Mr. Williams peels off layer after layer of the skin, body and spirit of his characters and leaves their nature exposed in the hideous humor and pathos of the truth.

New York Times

Mr. Williams is a master of [the short play and these] show his skills at their languid best, as well as those qualities of compassion, sentiment and wry humor that run through all his works like the dominant themes in a symphony.

—Clive Barnes, New York Times

…the language in his plays is as inventive and evocative as any we’ve had.

—Richard Gilman, New York Times

These stories provide a shimmering, expressionistic mirror of his emotional and imaginative life…They are, by turns, disturbing, moving and funny; and they help amplify Williams’ tragic vision.

—MIchiko Kakutani, New York Times

Tennessee Williams’ forgotten play turns out to be an absolute corker… Haunting, searing, unforgettable.

London Herald

Seeing The Glass Menagerie was like stumbling on a flower in a junkyard – Williams had pushed language and character to the front of the stage as never before.

—Arthur Miller

I did not think it possible to love or respect Tennessee Williams more than I already did, but his collected poems have proved me wrong. The dramatist would not have existed without the poet; they are both separate and indivisible. His ability to channel pain into beauty and his unflinching (and, for its time, remarkably courageous) honesty are revealed in a new light.

—Martin Sherman

Joyous, alarming, sexually confusing and dangerously funny.

—John Waters
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