This brilliant novel is surely one of the greatest the century has so far produced.
—Mark Ford, *New York Review of Books *

A daring masterwork by Javier Marias: Spain's most subtle and gifted writer (The Boston Globe)

Your Face Tomorrow Vol. 1: Fever & Spear

by Javier Marías

Translated by Margaret Jull Costa

Part spy novel, part romance, part Henry James, Your Face Tomorrow is a wholly remarkable display of the immense gifts of Javier Marias. With Fever and Spear, Volume One of his unfolding novel Your Face Tomorrow, he returns us to the rarified world of Oxford (the delightful setting of All Souls and Dark Back of Time), while introducing us to territory entirely new—espionage. Our hero, Jaime Deza, separated from his wife in Madrid, is a bit adrift in London until his old friend Sir Peter Wheeler–retired Oxford don and semi-retired master spy—recruits him for a new career in British Intelligence. Deza possesses a rare gift for seeing behind the masks people wear. He is soon observing interviews conducted by Her Majesty’s secret service: variously shady international businessmen one day, would-be coup leaders the next. Seductively, this metaphysical thriller explores past, present, and future in the ever-more-perilous 21st century. This compelling and enigmatic tour de force from one of Europe’s greatest writers continues with Volume Two: Dance and Dream.

Editions: PaperbackClothboundEbook

Buy from:

Your Independent Bookstore Barnes & Noble

Paperback (published September 1, 2007)

ISBN
9780811217279
Price US
19.95
Price CN
25.95
Trim Size
5x8
Page Count
414

Clothbound (published September 1, 2007)

ISBN
9780811216128
Price US
29.95
Trim Size
5x8
Page Count
400

Ebook (published September 1, 2007)

ISBN
9780811223898
Price US
19.95
Price CN
25.95
Page Count
400

Javier Marías

Contemporary Spanish novelist

This brilliant novel is surely one of the greatest the century has so far produced.
—Mark Ford, *New York Review of Books *
Marías's most extravagant showcase for ‘literary thinking’ so far. It also serves as a compelling introduction to his writing.
—Wyatt Mason, The New Yorker