Mishima was one of literature’s great romantics.

—Jay McInerney, The New York Times

For the first time in English, a glittering novella about stardom from “one of the greatest avant-garde Japanese writers of the twentieth century” (Judith Thurman, The New Yorker)

Available April 30, 2019

Star

Fiction by Yukio Mishima

All eyes are upon Rikio. And he likes it, mostly. His fans cheer from a roped-off section, screaming and yelling to attract his attention—they would kill for a moment alone with him. Finally the director sets up the shot, the camera begins to roll, someone yells “action”; Rikio, for a moment, transforms into another being, a hardened young yakuza, but as soon as the shot is finished, he slumps back into his own anxieties and obsessions.

Being a star, constantly performing, being watched and scrutinized as if under a microscope, is often a drag. But so is life. Written shortly after Yukio Mishima himself had acted in the film “Afraid to Die,” this novella is a rich and unflinching psychological portrait of a celebrity coming apart at the seams. With exquisite, vivid prose, Star begs the question: is there any escape from how we are seen by others?

Translated from the Japanese by Sam Bett

Your Independent Bookstore Barnes & Noble

Paperback (published April 30, 2019)

ISBN
9780811228428
Price US
11.95
Trim Size
4.5x8.25
Page Count
80
ISBN
9780811228435

Yukio Mishima

20th Century Japanese novelist and playwright

Mishima was one of literature’s great romantics.

—Jay McInerney, The New York Times

There may be no writer more autobiographical than Yukio Mishima. He resembles Céline and Genet, writers who were not political writers but who were working out the crisis of being alive, the crisis of experience itself. That’s precisely the way it is transcendent—it goes beyond the visible world into a world in which being alive makes sense.

—Philip Glass

Mishima is like Stendhal in his precise psychological analyses, like Dostoevsky in his explorations of darkly destructive personalities.

Christian Science Monitor