Like Paz, Bracho proceeds through association, moving from one motif to the next, rather than sketching a unified description. Her images, however, are less symbolic than his and more tactile (pulp, juice, moss), and her music, which Gander superbly re-creates, is less ringing and more sensual, slowed down by punctuation.
—Ratik Asokan, Poetry Foundation

A heartbreaking, unforgettable collection by the great Mexican poet Coral Bracho about her mother’s Alzheimer’s, exquisitely translated by the Pulitzer Prize–winning poet Forrest Gander

It Must Be a Misunderstanding

Poetry by Coral Bracho

Translated from the Spanish by Forrest Gander

Edited by Forrest Gander

It Must Be a Misunderstanding is the acclaimed Mexican poet Coral Bracho’s most personal and emotive collection to date, dedicated to her mother who died of complications from Alzheimer’s. Remarkably, Bracho, author and daughter, seems to disappear into her own empathic observations as her mother comes clear to us not as a tragic figure, but as a fiery and independent personality. The chemistry between them is vivid, poignant, and unforgettable. As the translator Forrest Gander explains in his foreword: the book’s force builds as the poems cycle through their sequences— from early to late Alzheimer’s—”with non-judgmental affection and compassionate watchfulness.”

Buy from:

Paperback (published May 3, 2022)

ISBN
9780811231398
Price US
16.95
Trim Size
5x8
Page Count
160

Ebook

ISBN
9780811231404

Coral Bracho

Contemporary Mexican poet

Like Paz, Bracho proceeds through association, moving from one motif to the next, rather than sketching a unified description. Her images, however, are less symbolic than his and more tactile (pulp, juice, moss), and her music, which Gander superbly re-creates, is less ringing and more sensual, slowed down by punctuation.
—Ratik Asokan, Poetry Foundation
Our losses have a way of locking us inside ourselves. But in It Must Be a Misunderstanding, Bracho endeavors against the odds to forge an “avid, intimate alliance / with the species,” keeping her eyes on the vanishingly few things that bind her to someone whose reality she’s no longer privileged to share.
—Andrew Chan, 4Columns
It is not dailiness with which her poems concern themselves, but ‘pure immensity.’
—C. D. Wright
Her work has altered the landscape of Mexican poetry in a way that is comparable to John Ashbery’s in the U.S.
Poetry