As in her novel “I Didn’t Talk” (also elaborately translated by Morris), Bracher brilliantly picks away at the web of secrets and lies plaguing a family and country.
—Andersen Tepper, New York Times

A brilliant, magisterial novel of family secrets simmering beneath the surface

Antonio

Fiction by Beatriz Bracher

Translated from the Portuguese by Adam Morris

Benjamin, on the verge of becoming a father, discovers a tragic family secret involving patrimony and determines to get to the root of. Those most immediately involved are all dead, but their three closest confidantes are still alive—Isabel, his grandmother; Haroldo, his grandfather’s friend; and Raul, his father’s friend—and each will tell him a different version of the facts.

By collecting these shards of memories, which offer personal glimpses into issues of class and politics in Brazil, Benjamin will piece together the painful puzzle of his family history. Like a Faulkner novel, Beatriz Bracher’s brilliant Antonioshows the expansiveness of past events and the complexity of untangling long-buried secrets.

“No one but Beatriz Bracher,” the Jornal do Brasil observed, “would be able to write a book like Antonio in Brazil today, because only she manages to write so intimately and forcefully, so ironically and bitterly, about the bourgeois upper class.”

Buy from:

Paperback (published March 2, 2021)

ISBN
9780811227384
Price US
15.95
Trim Size
5x8
Page Count
176

Ebook (published November 24, 2020)

ISBN
9780811227391
Page Count
176

Beatriz Bracher

Brazilian writer

As in her novel “I Didn’t Talk” (also elaborately translated by Morris), Bracher brilliantly picks away at the web of secrets and lies plaguing a family and country.
—Andersen Tepper, New York Times
Accreting through cumulative and sometimes contradictory accounts of a crumbling São Paulo dynasty, this philosophical novel examines what people present and what they conceal, even from themselves….Bracher and translator Morris render a sophisticated, multifaceted portrait of a family that endures nevertheless through its decline and the prolonged fallout from the choices they made—or that were left them—through the lives they lived. An elegant and nuanced meditation on family, class, perception, illness, and death.
Kirkus (starred review)
This spellbinding and surprising work announced Bracher as one of the most fascinating contemporary Brazilian writers.
Publishers Weekly (starred review)
Simmering.
Vanity Fair
No one but Beatriz Bracher would be able to write a book like Antonio in Brazil today, because only she manages to write so intimately and forcefully, so ironically and bitterly, about the bourgeois upper class.
Jornal do Brasil