In only 84 pages, Vila-Matas has crafted a dizzyingly original work… Brief History Of Portable Literature is a work by a deeply serious writer, dressing up his paean to the writer-reader relationship in the trappings of an experimental and lighthearted little book.

The AV Club

A reader’s fictional tour of the art and lives of some of the great 20th-century artists and writers

A Brief History of Portable Literature

Fiction by Enrique Vila-Matas

Translated by Thomas BunsteadAnne McLean

Your Independent Bookstore Barnes & Noble

Paperback (published June 9, 2015)

ISBN
9780811223379
Price US
14.95
Price CN
16.95
Page Count
128

Ebook (published June 9, 2015)

ISBN
9780811223386

In only 84 pages, Vila-Matas has crafted a dizzyingly original work… Brief History Of Portable Literature is a work by a deeply serious writer, dressing up his paean to the writer-reader relationship in the trappings of an experimental and lighthearted little book.

The AV Club

Vila-Matas is a remarkable ironist, a skill he deploys throughout Kassel and A Brief History as sly humour, but also as a destabilization technique to create nebulous, discomfiting spaces…

—Pasha Mall, The Globe and Mail

For Vila-Matas, literature is a chamber of echoes. But rather than thinking of this as a criticism, this is to be embraced—one of literature’s eternal beauties.

—Tristan Foster, Words Without Borders

Vila-Matas is a master.

Publishers Weekly

His intelligent playfulness and his fervor for written language are visible on every page and highlighted by this excellent translation. Vila-Matas is a master, one of the most gifted contemporary Spanish novelists.

Publishers Weekly

Vila-Matas’s touch is light and whimsical, while his allusions encompass a rogue’s gallery of world literature.

Time Out New York

Arguably Spain’s most significant contemporary literary figure.

—Joanna Kavenna, The New Yorker

Vila-Matas’s work made a tremendous impression on me. I was so fascinated by his humor, the incredible knowledge he has of all kinds of literature, his compassion for writers, and his fearlessness in taking on literary subjects and making that part of what he is writing about.

—Paul Auster