Roberto Bolaño

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A Little Lumpen Novelita

Fiction by Roberto Bolaño

Translated from the Spanish by Natasha Wimmer

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The Secret of Evil

Fiction by Roberto Bolaño

Translated from the Spanish by Chris Andrews Natasha Wimmer

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Between Parentheses

by Roberto Bolaño

Translated by Natasha Wimmer

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The Unknown University

Poetry by Roberto Bolaño

Translated from the Spanish by Laura Healy

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Tres

Poetry by Roberto Bolaño

Translated by Laura Healy

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Between Parentheses

Nonfiction by Roberto Bolaño

Translated from the Spanish by Natasha Wimmer

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The Insufferable Gaucho

Fiction by Roberto Bolaño

Translated from the Spanish by Chris Andrews

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The Return

Fiction by Roberto Bolaño

Translated from the Spanish by Chris Andrews

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Antwerp

Fiction by Roberto Bolaño

Translated from the Spanish by Natasha Wimmer

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Monsieur Pain

Fiction by Roberto Bolaño

Translated from the Spanish by Chris Andrews

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Nazi Literature in the Americas

Fiction by Roberto Bolaño

Translated from the Spanish by Chris Andrews

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Romantic Dogs

Poetry by Roberto Bolaño

Translated from the Spanish by Laura Healy

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Amulet

Fiction by Roberto Bolaño

Translated from the Spanish by Chris Andrews

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Last Evenings on Earth

Fiction by Roberto Bolaño

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Distant Star

Fiction by Roberto Bolaño

Translated from the Spanish by Chris Andrews

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By Night in Chile

Fiction by Roberto Bolaño

Translated from the Spanish by Chris Andrews

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The Skating Rink

Fiction by Roberto Bolaño

Translated from the Spanish by Chris Andrews

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An Episode in the Life of a Landscape Painter

Fiction by César Aira

Translated from the Spanish by Chris Andrews

With a contribution by Roberto Bolaño

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Bolaño is always refreshing to read because things are never what they seem.

—Randy Rosenthal, Tweed’s Magazine

A Little Lumpen Novelita, while short, is among Bolano’s most intoxicating works. Obsessive and ambiguous, its open-ended nature is reflective not only of the protagonist but of the author himself. And it further cements him as a master of the form, of any form.

—Juan Vidal, NPR

Bolaño’s spare prose lends his narrator’s account a chilly precision.

The New Yorker

Bolaño has joined the immortals.

The Washington Post

As for Bolaño, what can one say? One of our greatest writers, a straight colossus.

—Junot Diaz

One of the best books of the year—A Little Lumpen Novelita feels as substantial as a book three times as long… This is a glittering gem, as maddening and haunting as you’d expect from Bolaño.

—Gabe Habash, Publishers Weekly (Starred Review)

A Little Lumpen Novelita is a piece of intelligent realism without any sermons.

El País

A Little Lumpen Novelita is brave and beautiful, a ‘quiet storm’ that reminds us what a joy it is to read Bolaño’s intimate writing.

Revista Rocinante

This posthumous collection of the Chilean author’s ephemera proves brilliant.

Time Out New York

Reading Between Parentheses is not like sitting through an air-conditioned seminar with the distinguished Señor Bolaño. It’s like sitting on a barstool next to him, the jukebox playing dirty flamenco, after he’s consumed a platter of Pisco Sours. You may wish to make a batch yourself before you step onto the first page.

—Dwight Garner, The New York Times

Antwerp is a total avant-garde freakout, and among the most beautiful things Bolaño wrote.

The Millions

A spellbinder.

Newsweek

A spellbinder.

Newsweek

Something extraordinarily beautiful and (at least to me) entirely new.

—Francine Prose, The New York Times Book Review

Something extraordinarily beautiful and (at least to me) entirely new.

—Francine Prose, *The New York Times Book Review *

Bolaño has joined the immortals.

The Washington Post

Bolaño has joined the immortals.

The Washington Post

Bolaño has proven that literature can do anything.

—Jonathan Lethem

Bolaño has proven that literature can do anything.

—Jonathan Lethem

The closest thing, among all his writings, to a kind of fragmented ‘autobiography.’

—Ignacio Echevarría

The closest thing, among all his writings, to a kind of fragmented ‘autobiography.’

—Ignacio Echevarría

Electrifying.

Time

Electrifying.

Time

Never less than mesmerizing.

The Los Angeles Times

Never less than mesmerizing.

Los Angeles Times

The very highest level of literary achievement.

—Colm Tóibín

The very highest level of literary achievement.

—Colm Tóibín

An exemplary literary rebel.

—Sarah Kerr, The New York Review of Books

An exemplary literary rebel.

—Sarah Kerr, The New York Review of Books

In these essays we hear Bolaño’s real voice.

—Marcela Valdes, The Nation

In these essays we hear Bolaño’s real voice.

—Marcela Valdes, The Nation

They radiate the audacity of intellect, as well as the cruelty of vision, that have won their author a devoted following.

Boston Review

Raw, straightforward and crisp … striking, truly exceptional work. Beautifully unrefined.

American Book Review

Poems that unscroll like black-and-white movies or occupy pages like a tattoo, art and life entwine, and all is sinister and precious.

Booklist

Witty, sardonic poetry, the likes of which could be called ‘unimproved’ – lacking the polish of a shiny commodity. Wonderful.

—Forrest Gander, The Nation

Bolaño, the phantom mega-star of global fiction since his death in 2003, thought of himself as a poet first and a novelist second. In verse, as in prose, Bolaño leads us on journeys through a surreal landscape of exile, longing, and nostalgia.

The Independent

We savor all he has written, as every offering is a portal into the elaborate terrain of his genius.

—Patti Smith

One my best two books.

—Roberto Bolano

Wonderfully unreserved.

—Sarah Kerr, The New York Review of Books

They radiate the audacity of the intellect, as well as the cruelty of vision, that have won their author a devoted following.

Boston Review

Peers at the infinite through compelling, surreal and cinematic poems … beautiful.

The Faster Times

Bolano teeters on the brink of fantasy, but without ever detaching himself from a concrete, material world of pain and pleasure.

—Will Heyward, *The Australian *

It’s a book that illuminates the personal struggle behind one of the great literary careers of our times, a career that has come to define a global literary aesthetic.

The Los Angeles Times

Bolaño was hungry, this book reminds you, for just about everything.

—Dwight Garner, The New York Times

Its most recent poems were written fifteen years after its earliest, and many of these newer ones remind us of all the reasons why Bolaño is such a fantastic writer, one of the best of our times.

The Millions

Each tale turns the reader into a voyeur, grasping at snapshots of troubled lives and ghosts.

The Guardian

Although the thirteen stories that make up Roberto Bolaño’s newly translated collection percolate with brooding darkness, they also bubble with a surprising luminosity … each richer and more resonant than the last.

Time Out New York

The sense of embattlement that animates the writing, and the scab-picking intensity that he brings to his obsessions, makes The Return a compelling encapsulation of Bolaño’s work.

Los Angeles Times

Genius: This new collection of thirteen stories proves to be a defining sampler of Bolaño’s style, thematic concerns and favored character types.

Booklist

Dark, intimate, and sneakily touching: there is gold to be found in this collection.

—Michael Greenberg, The New York Review of Books

Bolaño succeeds in conjuring the unknowable empty spaces that an obsessive mind can imagine into the private lives of others.

The Rumpus

Despite its rawness, the brilliance is still there.

Daily Kos

Each of these tales boasts an aspect of Bolaño’s prodigious talent: his ability to leap into a character’s skin, quickly, with compelling confidence; or his facility for making sinister personalities and surreally uncomfortable situations feel all too plausible.

Time Out Chicago

A living, breathing, true-to-life mystery with so many shades of exposure, the story’s inconclusiveness seems preordained, exquisitely inevitable.

The Millions

There is something we take away from each of them, some phrase that stops us dead with admiration, or a vision that plunges us far beyond the surface of the prose.

The Nervous Breakdown

Paragraphs demand to be reread, because they give you the feeling that you’ve missed something. You did miss something, but you won’t find it in the printed words. It’s the space around the words where you’ll find the answer.

The Coffin Factory

It’s a glimpse into the process of a totemic artistic figure.

The A.V Club

Each of the tales boast an aspect of Bolaño’s prodigious talent.

Time Out New York

Bolaño’s writing is reliably intriguing.

Publishers Weekly

Bolano’s febrile narrative tack and occasional surreal touches bring to mind the classics of Latin American magic realism his cerebral protagonist and nonfiction borrowings are reminiscent of Thomas Bernhard and W.G. Sebald. The novel, Bolaño’s first to be translated into English, is at once occasion for celebration.

The New York Times

The most influential and admired novelist of his generation in the Spanish-speaking world.

—Susan Sontag, Los Angeles Times Book Review

Bolaño was no political pamphleteer. And yet his characters’ angst and desires play out against the canvas of history. With his raw, barely controlled emotions, and a talent for mining the pathos, beauty, and even humor amid the horror of ordinary life, his fiction soared.

The Daily Beast

That dream, its stubborn survival despite all evidence of its defeat, would become the subject of much of Bolaño’s writing.

—Ben Ehrenreich, the arabophile

If you haven’t heard of Roberto Bolaño yet, you will soon.

—Benjamin Lytal, New York Sun

A witty, sardonic poetry, the likes of which could be called ‘unimproved’––lacking the polish of shiny commodity. With Bolaño, we encounter not only the ‘fist-fucking’ but ‘feet-fucking’ in a poem that also mentions Pascal, Nazi generals, Shining Path bonfires, and a teenage hooker. With Bolaño, the explicit description of a sexual encounter is fragmented by temporal disjunctions, heuristic leaps of thought and a barking dog; in the end, God and an author show up… The poems shine their beery light on life’s romantic dogs; dreamers, detectives, and poets who do double-time as saints and martyrs.

—Forrest Gander, Nation
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