The Illustrious House of Ramires (New)

Fiction by José Maria de Eça de Queirós

Translated from the Portuguese by Margaret Jull Costa

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The Yellow Sofa

Fiction by José Maria de Eça de Queirós

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The City and the Mountains

Fiction by José Maria de Eça de Queirós

Translated by Margaret Jull Costa

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The Maias

Fiction by José Maria de Eça de Queirós

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The Crime of Father Amaro

Fiction by José Maria de Eça de Queirós

Translated by Margaret Jull Costa

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The Illustrious House of Ramires

Fiction by José Maria de Eça de Queirós

Translated by Ann Stevens

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What does Eça’s Portugal feel like? It is dominated by hot sunny days, white trousers, dust, theater tickets and evening strolls in Sintra, roses in buttonholes and glimpses of gowned women getting in and out of coaches, gorgeous landscapes and trees and flowers, hale farmers and country maids, long conversations, cats and singing birds and orchards, pumpkins drying on a station roof, baked sweet rice, and cheese pastries.

—James Guida, The New York Review of Books

“Elegantly poetic prose… Fans of Vargas Llosa and Saramago will find a kindred spirit in these pages.”

Kirkus

José Maria de Eça de Queirós, where have you been all my life?

—Lorin Stein, The Paris Review

Eça de Queirós ought to be up there with Balzac, Dickens, and Tolstoy as one of the talismanic names of the nineteenth century.

London Observer

A writer of genius.

—Harold Bloom

A writer of mesmerizing literary power. We should be grateful for such blessings.

—Michael Dirda, Washington Post Book World

Portugal’s greatest novelist.

—Jose Saramago

Queirós is far greater than my own dear master, Flaubert.

—Emile Zola

The Maias is one of the most impressive European novels of the nineteenth century, fully comparable to the most inspired novels of the great Russian, French, Italian and English masters of prose fiction. A family chronicle of intense historical insight and narrative power, The Maias reveals the decadence of Portugal in its long decline that was to culminate in the Salazar Fascist regime of the twentieth century. More than that, The Maias is a vision also of the general European malaise that eventually brought on the two World Wars and their aftermaths.

—Harold Bloom
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