Gustave Flaubert

Gustave Flaubert (1821–1880) was a French novelist. The son of a surgeon, Flaubert studied law unsuccessfully in Paris and returned home to devote himself to writing. Because of a severe nervous malady he spent most of his life at Croisset, near Rouen, with his mother and niece. In 1856, after five years of work, Flaubert published his masterpiece, Madame Bovary, in a Paris journal, followed by The Sentimental Education (1870), The Temptation of St. Anthony (1874), Three Tales (1877). After his death his unfinished satire Bouvard and Pécuchet was published in 1881.

Two Deaths

Fiction by Gustave Flaubert

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A Simple Heart

Fiction by Gustave Flaubert

In A Simple Heart, the poignant story that inspired Julian Barnes’ Flaubert’s Parrot, Félicité, a French housemaid, approaches a lifetime of servitude with human-scaled but angelic aplomb. No other author has imparted so much beauty and integrity to so modest an existence. Flaubert’s “great saint” endures loss after loss by embracing the rich, true rhythms of life: the comfort of domesticity, the solace of the Church, and the depth of memory.…
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Dictionary Of Accepted Ideas

Fiction by Gustave Flaubert

Translated from the French by Jacques Barzun

With a contribution by Gustave Flaubert

Throughout his life Flaubert made it a game to eavesdrop for the cliché, the platitude, the borrowed and unquestioned idea with which the “right thinking” swaddle their minds. After his death his little treasury of absurdities, of half-truths and social lies, was published as a Dictionnaire des idées reçues. Because its devastating humor and irony are often dependent on the phrasing in vernacular French, the Dictionnaire was long considered untranslatable. This notion was taken as a challenge by Jacques Barzun.…
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