Between the inward tension of the point and the outward push of the line, Thalia Field maps a force field of relations, power games, shifting configurations. In a language both cool and intense, and with a surveyor's precision. But for all the geometries, we are irresistibly pulled towards the center, the emotion which cannot be stated or described, only surrounded, so that the real story happens in the consciousness of the reader.
—Rosmarie Waldrop

Point And Line

Poetry by Thalia Field

The writings in Thalia Field’s long-awaited new book, Point and Line, wonderfully defy categorization. Perhaps describable as “epic poetries,” they represent a confluence of genres (fiction, theater, and poetry) in which Thalia Field has been involved over the course of her career. Written from a constructivist, post-genre sensibility, eluding classification, Field’s work presents her concerns with clarity in a world that resists it. Some pieces use generative schemes, portraits of mental shapes, which create meaning out of noise. In “Hours” and “Setting, the Table,” Field uses indeterminate performance techniques to emphasize the categorical/conceptual nature of thought. Visually, each chapter is captivating, showing both the author’s need for shapes and colors in her work, and her fascination with the contours of speech.

Editions: Paperback

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Paperback (published April 1, 2000)

ISBN
9780811214421
Price US
14.95
Trim Size
6x9
Page Count
144

Thalia Field

Contemporary American fiction writer

Between the inward tension of the point and the outward push of the line, Thalia Field maps a force field of relations, power games, shifting configurations. In a language both cool and intense, and with a surveyor's precision. But for all the geometries, we are irresistibly pulled towards the center, the emotion which cannot be stated or described, only surrounded, so that the real story happens in the consciousness of the reader.
—Rosmarie Waldrop