Paul Celan and the Trans-Tibetan Angel

Yoko Tawada

A poignant ode to artistic inspiration… inventive and deeply human.

Publishers Weekly, starred review

A moving story about friendship, illness, and the poetry of Paul Celan by the astonishing Yoko Tawada, winner of the National Book Award

Available Jul, 09 2024

Paul Celan and the Trans-Tibetan Angel

Fiction by Yoko Tawada

Translated from German by Susan Bernofsky

With a contribution by Susan Bernofsky

Patrik, who sometimes calls himself “the patient,” is a literary researcher living in present-day Berlin. The city is just coming back to life after lockdown, and his beloved opera houses are open again, but Patrik cannot leave the house and hardly manages to get out of bed. When he shaves his head, his girlfriend scolds him, “What have you done to your head? I don’t want to be with a prisoner from a concentration camp!” He is supposed to give a paper at a conference in Paris, on the poetry collection Threadsuns by Paul Celan, but he can’t manage to get past the first question on the registration form: “What is your nationality?” Then at a café (or in the memory of being at a café?), he meets a mysterious stranger. The man’s name is Leo-Eric Fu, and somehow he already knows Patrik…

In the spirit of imaginative homage like Roberto Bolaño’s Monsieur Pain, Antonio Tabucchi’s Requiem, and Thomas Bernhard’s Wittgenstein’s Nephew, Yoko Tawada’s mesmerizing new novel unfolds like a lucid dream in which friendship, conversation, reading, poetry, and music are the connecting threads that bind us together.

Buy Paul Celan and the Trans-Tibetan Angel

Paperback(published Jul, 09 2024)

ISBN
9780811234870
Price US
14.95
Trim Size
4 1/2 x 7 1/4
Page Count
144

Ebook

ISBN
9780811234887
Portrait of Yoko Tawada

Yoko Tawada

Contemporary Japanese-German prose writer

A poignant ode to artistic inspiration… inventive and deeply human.

Publishers Weekly, starred review

Yoko Tawada conjures a world between languages … She is a master of subtraction, whose characters often find themselves stripped of language in foreign worlds.

Julian Lucas, The New Yorker

The varied characters in Tawada’s work—from different countries, of different sexes and species—are united by the quality that Walter Benjamin describes as ‘crepuscular’: ‘None has a firm place in the world, or firm, inalienable outlines.'

Rivka Galchen, The New York Times Magazine