There is a wild sardonic humor about Mr. Evans’s hatred, something which whips the narrative off realism’s earth.
—V.S. Pritchett

Nothing To Pay

Fiction by Caradoc Evans

When Caradoc Evans’s novel Nothing to Pay appeared in 1930, it met with much admiration and also much resistance. His ruthless exposure of the Nonconformist establishment undermined the commonly held view that the Welsh were a pastoral, God-fearing people. As Jeremy Brooks put it The Independent, “What the Welsh could not forgive was that they recognized themselves only too clearly in Evans’s satirical portraits.” But Dylan Thomas praised Evans’s work relentlessly, and H.G. Wells said in a lecture: “There was one, who is too little esteemed, who has done the thing [of telling about the trade shops] with a certain brutal thoroughness, and he tells a great deal of truth. That is Caradoc Evans in his book Nothing to Pay.” (In America, H.L. Mencken saw in Evans the fundamentalists of the South laid bare, and offered one hundred free copies of his story collection to the local YMCA.) Nothing to Pay relates the story of Amos Morgan, an ambitious draper from Cardiganshire who works his way up to London through the shop trade. Largely autobiographical, this novel was admired by the Welsh literati and has since become a classic of Welsh literature, not only for its scathing satire, but for its brilliant linguistic inventiveness and poetic style.

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Paperback (published June 1, 1995)

ISBN
9780811212908
Price US
11.95
Trim Size
5x8
Page Count
240

Caradoc Evans

20th century Welsh story-writer, journalist, playwright and novelist

There is a wild sardonic humor about Mr. Evans’s hatred, something which whips the narrative off realism’s earth.
—V.S. Pritchett