The novel bears the playwright’s familiar stamp on almost every page. And underlying the novel is Mr. Williams’s message that if people can only find a little love in the dark night—a little warmth, a little kindness, a hand extended across the chasm—they will be saved from the icy world of reason that so oppresses them
The New York Times

What’s not to like about Tennessee Williams’s most forthright work about homosexual love, with its gay figure skaters, runaways, and sex?

Moise and the World of Reason

Fiction by Tennessee Williams

An erotic, sensual, and comic novel that was a generation ahead of its time, Moise and the World of Reason has at its center the need of three people for each other: Lance, the beautiful black figure skater full of love and lust for young men as well as a craving for drugs; the nameless gay young narrator, a runaway writer from Alabama who lives near the piers of New York City’s West Village, c. 1975, frantically filling notebooks with his observations; and Moise—“Say mo, and then say ease, with the accent placed (ironically) on the ease”—a young woman who speaks in riddles and can never finish her paintings or consummate her affairs.

The long unavailable Moise and the World of Reason represents a kind of uncensored Williams, radically frank, fully articulated, and deeply tender: a true gem.

Editions: PaperbackEbook

Buy from:

Your Independent Bookstore Barnes & Noble

Paperback (published July 12, 2016)

ISBN
9780811225618
Price US
15.95
Price CN
19.5
Trim Size
5 x 8
Page Count
224

Ebook (published July 12, 2016)

ISBN
9780811225625

Tennessee Williams

America’s playwright

The novel bears the playwright’s familiar stamp on almost every page. And underlying the novel is Mr. Williams’s message that if people can only find a little love in the dark night—a little warmth, a little kindness, a hand extended across the chasm—they will be saved from the icy world of reason that so oppresses them
The New York Times
Lovely writing. Some of his descriptive passages unfold like dark flowers. There’s charm, grace, beauty here. Moise has the sound and feel of art.
The Washington Post
There is no such thing as ‘bad’ Tennessee Williams; only wounded, subtle, sad little songs of defeat like Moise that should jolt adventurous readers everywhere. You might laugh out loud in pleasure at this radical little novel. I sure did
—John Waters