Joyce Cary

Joyce Cary (1888–1957), an Irish novelist often identified with Modernism, was born in Dery, Ireland but lived in England for most of his life. Cary studied art in Edinburgh but, realizing he would never be a great painter, switched to literature and enrolled in Trinity College, Oxford. The publication of Mister Johnson in 1939 brought him attention as an author. In 1952, Cary was diagnosed with motor neuron disease, which made it harder and harder for him to write. A trilogy was left unfinished when he passed away in 1957.

House Of Children

Fiction by Joyce Cary

A House of Children (1941) is the late English novelist Joyce Cary’s nearly autobiographical story of childhood summers spent in Donegal. Similar in spirit and structure to James Joyce’s A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, the novel is a series of “epiphanies” experienced by a young boy, Evelyn. Nothing that could engage a youthful imagination is unworthy of mention: a day’s sail to the caves, midnight swims, or a ferry boat ride.…
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Prisoner of Grace

Fiction by Joyce Cary

Joyce Cary (1888-1957) is indisputably one of the finest English novelists of this century. His reputation at his death equaled those of such contemporaries as Aldous Huxley and Evelyn Waugh. His exuberant style allowed him to create a vivid array of men and women whose stories embody the conflicts of their day and whose characters are beautifully realized. Written in his last years, his “Second Trilogy” (Prisoner of Grace, Except the Lord, and Not Honour More) shows the mature Cary at his most brilliant, as he unfolds the tragicomedy of private lives compromised by politics and religion.…
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Not Honour More

Fiction by Joyce Cary

Joyce Cary (1888-1957) is indisputably one of the finest English novelists of this century. His reputation at his death equaled those of such contemporaries as Aldous Huxley and Evelyn Waugh. His exuberant style allowed him to create a vivid array of men and women whose stories embody the conflicts of their day and whose characters are beautifully realized. Written in his last years, his “Second Trilogy” (Prisoner of Grace, Except the Lord, and Not Honour More) shows the mature Cary at his most brilliant, as he unfolds the tragicomedy of private lives compromised by politics and religion.…
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Except the Lord

Fiction by Joyce Cary

Joyce Cary (1888-1957) is indisputably one of the finest English novelists of this century. His reputation at his death equaled those of such contemporaries as Aldous Huxley and Evelyn Waugh. Written in his last years, his “Second Trilogy” (Prisoner of Grace, Except the Lord, and Not Honour More) shows the mature Cary at his most brilliant, as he unfolds the tragicomedy of private lives compromised by politics and religion. While in his earlier trilogy (Herself Surprised, To Be a Pilgrim, and The Horse’s Mouth) he pits the visionary artist against an indifferent but by no means dull world, in his masterful “Second Trilogy” he maps that gray landscape between good and evil where life is at its most dangerous.…
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