Homero Aridjis

One of Latin America’s foremost literary figures, Homero Aridjis (1940-) was born in Contepec, Michoacán, Mexico. He has written fifty-one books of poetry and prose and won many important literary prizes. Formerly the Mexican ambassador to Switzerland, the Netherlands, and UNESCO, he is the president emeritus of PEN International. He is founder and president of the Group of 100, an environmentalist association of writers, artists, and scientists.

Self-Portrait in the Zone of Silence

Poetry by Homero Aridjis

Translated from the Spanish by George McWhirter

Self-Portrait in the Zone of Silence, by the renowned Mexican writer Homero Aridjis, is brilliant collection of poems written in and for the new century. Aridjis seeks spiritual transformation through encounters with mythical animals, family ghosts, migrant workers, Mexico’s oppressed, female saints, other writers (such as Jorge Luis Borges and Philip Lamantia), and naked angels in the metro. We find tributes to Goya and Heraclitus, denunciations of drug traffickers and political figureheads, and unforgettable imaginary landscapes.…
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Eyes To See Otherwise

Eyes to See Otherwise is the first widely representative selection by Mexico’s greatest living poet to be published in a bilingual edition. The range and quality of the translations, by some of America’s finest poets, mark the centrality of his work on the map of modern poetry. Homero Aridjis’s sources range from Nahuatl chants and Huichol initiation songs to San Juan de la Cruz and the 16th-century Spanish poet Luis de Góngora y Argote.…
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A great flame passes through the words, the poetry, of Homero Aridjis, who sets reality alight in images that at once illuminate and consume it, making life a sister of dream. Homero is a great poet; our century has great need of him.
—Yves Bonnefoy
Aridjis is a poet of great vitality and originality.
—W. S. Merwin
Homero Aridjis’s poems open a door into the light.
—Seamus Heaney
In his vast oeuvre, Aridjis has produced many works that confront apocalyptic times.
—Carlos Fonseca, Los Angeles Review of Books
Homero Aridjis’s poems open a door into the light.
—Seamus Heaney
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