Dunya Mikhail

The Beekeeper

by Dunya Mikhail

Translated by Max Weiss Dunya Mikhail

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The Iraqi Nights

Poetry by Dunya Mikhail

Translated from the Arabic by Kareem James Abu-Zeid

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Diary Of A Wave Outside The Sea

Poetry by Dunya Mikhail

Translated by Elizabeth Winslow

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The War Works Hard

Poetry by Dunya Mikhail

Translated by Elizabeth Winslow

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Fifteen Iraqi Poets

Poetry

Edited by Dunya Mikhail

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Dunya Mikhail is a woman who speaks like the disillusioned goddesses of Babylon. Blunt as well as subtle, she makes of war a distinct entity, thus turning it into a myth. To her own question, ‘What does it mean to die all this death?,’ her poems answer that it means to reveal the only redeeming power that we have: the existence of love.

—Etel Adnan

Here is the new Iraqi poetry

—Pierre Joris

The poems in this extraordinary collection sway back and forth between America (as a new home) and Baghdad (as a birthplace), between the artifacts of ancient Sumerian civilization and the walls of our modern times. There is no trace of nostalgia in Mikhail’s poetry, though her words feel poignantly real and rare, as if creating a museum of memories.

—Hatem al-Sager, Al-Ittihad

Somewhere between a cutting-edge film and a 1002nd night of storytelling, interspersed with drawings and calligraphy, Dunya Mikhail’s new poems reframe, in a contemporary woman’s voice, the great poet al-Sayab’s cry from the heart: ‘Iraq, Iraq, nothing but Iraq!’ Here, myth alleviates the exile’s longing, and exilic longin itself opens the poet’s eyes to broad horizons.

—Marilyn Hacker

Mikhail’s style maintains an impressive fragility and delicacy of image that touches the reader’s heart…

American Poetry Review

Here is the new Iraqi poetry: a poetry of urgency that has no time for the traditional (in Arab poetry) flowers of rhetoric; terse, unadorned, stripped & ironic, Dunya Mikhail’s lines move at the speed of events-be it war or love. Here the fierceness of the public life meshes with the hard-won tenderness of the private, in a passionate dialectic that makes her voice the inescapable voice of Arab poetry today.

—Pierre Joris

Mikhail’s style maintains an impressive fragility and delicacy of image that touches the reader’s heart…

American Poetry Review
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