Pearls series

This collection of vignettes, made up of short scenes and anecdotes, reads like quiet prose poems that stay with the reader. Translated by Maria Jolas, Tropisms is a masterpiece, short but powerful in every sense.

—Juan Vidal, NPR Best Books of 2015

Nathalie Sarraute’s stunning debut–vignettes of inner movements–foreshadowed the rise of the Nouveau Roman

Tropisms

Fiction by Nathalie Sarraute

Translated from the French by Maria Jolas

Your Independent Bookstore Barnes & Noble

Paperback (published November 10, 2015)

ISBN
9780811222761
Price US
10.95
Price CN
12.95
Trim Size
4 x 7
Page Count
96

Ebook (published November 10, 2015)

ISBN
9780811222778

This collection of vignettes, made up of short scenes and anecdotes, reads like quiet prose poems that stay with the reader. Translated by Maria Jolas, Tropisms is a masterpiece, short but powerful in every sense.

—Juan Vidal, NPR Best Books of 2015

The book has such intensity that it feels imperative…her work is immersive and consuming; when you look up from the page you see and feel the world differently.

—Pasha Malla, The Globe and Mail

It was Sarraute who started the denunciation of ‘character’ in the Balzacian sense, and tried to find the inner impulses of the hero at the moment he endeavors to express himself. What she calls ‘tropisms’ are the tiny imperceptible interactions between people—the little games of aggression and retreat, the miniscule battles that constitute the present state of the psyche.

—Alain Robbe-Grillet, Paris Review

Tropisms—something like ‘prose poems’—as Sarraute calls them that—this is her form! Her texture is anti-novelistic, though she’s decided to write ‘novels’ and launched an important critique of the novel on the basis of her method.

—Susan Sontag

Reading Sarraute is like watching a news broadcast in which the anchorman speaks trivilaties and bromides while the crawl below sends word of seiges and conflagrations in a slowly unwinding procession.

—James Gibbons, BOOKFORUM

Sarraute has cracked open the ‘smooth and hard’ surface of the traditional characters in order to discover the endless vibrations of moods and sentiments, the tremors of a never-ending series of earthquakes in the microcosm of the self.

—Hannah Arendt, The New York Review of Books

Sarraute shows us in small immediate moves how a person can be pushed toward marriage or murder.

The New Yorker