When Mozart was rehearsing his cast for the premiere of The Marriage of Figaro, the astonished singers, going through their parts for the first time, would stop to shout “Bravo il maestro.” One feels, delightedly, the same way reading through this new book by John Frederick Nims—the whole time eager to applaud his exuberant virtuosity.
—J. D. McClatchy

Available October 1, 1986

The Six-Cornered Snowflake And Other Poems

Poetry by John Nims

As a preeminent modernist poet and translator of the classics, John Frederick Nims’s work is an elegant fusion of contemporary sensibility with formalist experimentation. But form, for this writer of meditative verse, is only a helpmeet to the quintessential content of the poem, the meaning that gives it value in our time and, one hopes, beyond. Concerning the formal elements of poetry, Nims comments: “One might say they are like the scaffolding at a construction site, meant to be thrown away and not regarded once the building is completed.” In his newest collection, The Six-Cornered Snowflake, his poems range through an astonishing variety of complex structures: the shaped-poem of the title work, the sestina, the vocal “Pindar’s lattice” of the “First Olympian Ode,” the nervous galliambics of “Catullus 63”—just to name a few. As William Pritchard, writing for The New York Times Book Review, so aptly observed, “Mr. Nims has consistently had the nerve to be interested in what language could be made to do, rather than what the psyche would be made to reveal.”

Editions: PaperbackClothbound

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Paperback (published October 1, 1986)

ISBN
9780811211444
Price US
14.95

Clothbound (published October 1, 1986)

ISBN
9780811211437
Price US
14.95
Page Count
64

John Nims

20th Century American Poet

When Mozart was rehearsing his cast for the premiere of The Marriage of Figaro, the astonished singers, going through their parts for the first time, would stop to shout “Bravo il maestro.” One feels, delightedly, the same way reading through this new book by John Frederick Nims—the whole time eager to applaud his exuberant virtuosity.
—J. D. McClatchy