Caught between departure and arrival, in the middle of Borchert's world, stands the wanderer, the seeker…who is pursued by his own memories and by the question of guilt.
—Alfred Andersch

The Man Outside

Fiction by Wolfgang Borchert

Translated from the German by Kay Boyle

With a contribution by Wolfgang Borchert

Wolfgang Borchert died in 1947––the twenty-six-year-old victim of a malaria-like fever contracted during World War II. This was just one day after the premier of his play, The Man Outside, which caused an immediate furor throughout his native Germany with its youthful, indeed revolutionary, vision against war and the dehumanizing effects of the police state. In a very real sense, Borchert was both the moral and physical victim of the Third Reich and the Nazi war machine. As a Wehrmacht conscript, he twice served on the Russian front, where he was wounded, and twice was imprisoned for his outspokenness. His voice speaks plainly and powerfully from out of the war’s carnage all the more poignantly for its being cut short at so young an age. This collection of Borchert’s most important prose, translated by A. D. Porter with an Introduction by Stephen Spender, includes the complete text of the title play, as well as 39 stories and assorted pieces that comprise much of the author’s output during the two short, fever-ridden years in which he wrote, complemented by Kay Boyle’s appreciative Foreword.

Editions: Paperback

Buy from:

Your Independent Bookstore Barnes & Noble

Paperback (published January 1, 1952)

ISBN
9780811200110
Price US
16.95
Page Count
270

Wolfgang Borchert

20th century German author and playright of the Trümmerliteratur movement

Caught between departure and arrival, in the middle of Borchert's world, stands the wanderer, the seeker…who is pursued by his own memories and by the question of guilt.
—Alfred Andersch
There are days when I have been unable to start writing without first opening Borchert's book and reading a page of it.
—Kay Boyle