[A] paean to Greece drawn out of a nine-month visit … the gestation time for a human and, in Miller’s case, for the imaginative recreation of a country.

—Richard Eder, The New York Times

The Colossus Of Maroussi

Nonfiction by Henry Miller

With a contribution by Will Self Ian S. MacNiven

Like the ancient colossus that stood over the harbor of Rhodes, Henry Miller’s The Colossus of Maroussi stands as a seminal classic in travel literature. It has preceded the footsteps of prominent travel writers such as Pico Iyer and Rolf Potts. The book Miller would later cite as his favorite began with a young woman’s seductive description of Greece. Miller headed out with his friend Lawrence Durrell to explore the Grecian countryside: a flock of sheep nearly tramples the two as they lie naked on a beach; the Greek poet Katsimbalis, the “colossus” of Miller’s book, stirs every rooster within earshot of the Acropolis with his own loud crowing; cold hardboiled eggs are warmed in a village’s single stove, and they stay in hotels that “have seen better days, but which have an aroma of the past.”

Your Independent Bookstore Barnes & Noble

Paperback (published April 1, 2010)

ISBN
9780811218573
Price US
14.95
Price CN
16
Trim Size
5x7
Page Count
240

Ebook (published April 1, 2010)

ISBN
9780811219150
Price US
12.95
Page Count
240

Henry Miller

20th Century American writer

[A] paean to Greece drawn out of a nine-month visit … the gestation time for a human and, in Miller’s case, for the imaginative recreation of a country.

—Richard Eder, The New York Times

One of the five greatest travel books of all time.

—Pico Iyer