The Book of Happiness is wonderfully attentive, particularly to the odd, gratuitous ways that love affairs begin, and that the only endings it takes seriously are the deaths.
New York Times Book Review

The Book of Happiness

Fiction by Nina Berberova

Translated by Marian Schwartz

The Book of Happiness is the most autobiographical of the novels the great Russian writer Nina Berberova (1901-1993) wrote during the years she lived in Paris. “All Berberova’s characters live raw, unfurnished lives, in poverty, on the edge of cities, with little sense of belonging––except in moments of epiphany––to their time and in life itself” (The Observer). Such a character is Vera, the protagonist of The Book of Happiness. At the novel’s opening, Vera is summoned to the scene of a suicide, that of her closest childhood companion, Sam Adler, whose family left Russia in the early days of the revolution and whom Vera has not seen in many years. From here Berberova spins the story with a wonderful unsentimental poignancy, creating a lasting testament to the indestructibility of happiness.

Editions: PaperbackClothbound

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Paperback (published May 1, 2002)

ISBN
9780811215039
Price US
12.95
Trim Size
5x8
Page Count
224

Clothbound (published May 1, 2002)

ISBN
9780811214018
Price US
23.95
Trim Size
5x8
Page Count
224

Nina Berberova

20th century Russian immigrant novelist and short story writer who settled in Paris

The Book of Happiness is wonderfully attentive, particularly to the odd, gratuitous ways that love affairs begin, and that the only endings it takes seriously are the deaths.
New York Times Book Review