Tibor Déry has few equals among writers in Hungarian…. [He] is one of the…masters of that great tradition of European realism that we associated with the name of Thomas Mann, and he deserves our close attention.
TLS

Love and Other Stories

Fiction by Tibor Déry

Translated from the Hungarian by George Szirtes

With a contribution by Tibor Déry

Today, Tibor Déry is venerated as one of the most important literary figures of Hungary and, like Chekhov, a master of the modern short story.  Love and Other Stories, presents some of Déry’s finest work. In “Games of the Underworld,” ordinary people in Budapest try to survive the winter of war in cramped cellars and encounter menacing Arrow-Cross men, a towering giant, a blind horse, a vinegar sponge; in “The Circus,” a group of bored children transmogrifies into a grotesque spectacle; in “Love,” a political prisoner is released after seven years and returns home to his wife and son. George Szirtes, the award-winning translator from the Hungarian and winner of the 2004 T.S. Eliot Prize for poetry, gives a brilliant introduction to this visionary collection that deals passionately with questions of responsibility and conscience, of social justice and renewal.

Editions: Paperback

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Paperback (published June 1, 2005)

ISBN
9780811216258
Price US
17.95
Trim Size
5x8
Page Count
254

Tibor Déry

20th century Hungarian writer

Tibor Déry has few equals among writers in Hungarian…. [He] is one of the…masters of that great tradition of European realism that we associated with the name of Thomas Mann, and he deserves our close attention.
TLS
These are stories of hardship, injustice, cruelty, and hope. All take place in Budapest during and after the Second World War, but, for their keenness of eye and largeness of heart, they belong to a tradition of dramatic storytelling that isn't confined by period or place. They remind me of Stories by Tolstoy, Checkhov, Verga, Lawrence and Hemingway. Here is one of the outstanding writers of the twentieth century.
—Ben Sonnenberg
Tibor Déry was a dissenter, a subversive revolutionary and, in his old age, a jailbird. He was also one of the greatest stylists in the history of Hungarian literature.
—Péter Nádas
… this retrospective collection … should remind them [US readers] of Déry's central place in modern Hungarian literature.
Publishers Weekly
Tibor Déry has few equals among writers in Hungarian…He is one of the masters of that great tradition of European realism that we associated with the name of Thomas Mann, and he deserves our close attention.
Times Literary Supplement