As Cortázar stresses throughout his talks, writing is rarely a pursuit of answers but, rather, about investigation—of the self, of one’s work, and of the world at large. The goal of the novel, Cortázar says, is to harmonize its formal and literal questions into a central, destabilizing quandary: ‘Why are things like they are and not otherwise?

The New Yorker

A master class from the exhilarating writer Julio Cortázar

Literature Class

Nonfiction by Julio Cortázar

Translated by Katherine Silver

Your Independent Bookstore Barnes & Noble

Paperback (published March 28, 2017)

ISBN
9780811225342
Price US
18.95
Price CN
24.95
Trim Size
5.5 x 8
Page Count
280

Ebook (published March 28, 2017)

ISBN
9780811225359

Julio Cortázar

20th century Argentine novelist, poet, essayist, short-story writer and Surrealist

More by this author

As Cortázar stresses throughout his talks, writing is rarely a pursuit of answers but, rather, about investigation—of the self, of one’s work, and of the world at large. The goal of the novel, Cortázar says, is to harmonize its formal and literal questions into a central, destabilizing quandary: ‘Why are things like they are and not otherwise?

The New Yorker

[T]he lectures, at times, do feel cobbled together—but in the best way, in the way of art that thrives in complexity and contradiction. They are made from pieces of Cortázar’s life, his writing, his experiences as a young writer in Argentina and an as exile in Paris, his deep engagement with literature and cinema and politics, and they show the mind of a writer at work, asking questions and unearthing new possibilities.

The Rumpus

Based on the words spoken by Cortázar and his students, the class that he taught appears to be an interesting hybrid of Cortázar as tour guide of his body of work, and as mentor into the broader lessons about the qualities of fiction that resonated most with him.

Culture Trip

The consequent lectures—originally delivered in Spanish and translated adeptly by Katherine Silver—are erudite, intimate, charmingly fragmented, and anecdotal, covering a range of topics, from “Eroticism and Literature” to “The Realistic Short Story.”

—Dustin Illingworth, The Atlantic

One of those books that radically shifted my thinking about the possibilities of narrative.

—Christopher Higgs, Big Other

He was, perhaps without trying, the Argentine who made the whole world love him.

—Gabriel García Márquez

A first-class literary imagination.

The New York Times

Anyone who doesn’t read Cortázar is doomed.

—Pablo Neruda