What appeals to me most about [McClure’s] poems is the fury and the imagery of them. I love the vividness of his reactions and the very personal turns and swirls of the lines. The worlds in which I myself live, the private world of personal reactions, the biological world (animals and plants and even bacteria chase each other through the poems), the world of the atom and the molecule, the stars and galaxies, are all there: and in between, above and below, stands man, the howling mammal, contrived out of ‘meat’ by chance and necessity.
—Francis Crick

Jaguar Skies

Poetry by Michael McClure

“Perhaps the crux of all writing is to find the word that describes what the eye has seen and the mind imagined,” says Josephson Nicholson in Rolling Stone. “Judged on that basis, Michael McClure’s . . . most recent books are as good as anything going. Their advantage is Sheer Scope.” In Jaguar Skies McClure reaffirms the biological intelligence, indeed the active principle, at the heart of his own work. As the book demonstrates so clearly, the exuberant resonances of his verse approach cosmic echoings, while the precise patterns mirror the intricate pulsations of molecules and stars. For McClure, “ecology” is not an ideal but the unalterable fact of all existence: it is how the universe breathes.

Editions: Paperback

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Paperback (published November 1, 1975)

ISBN
9780811205801
Price US
15.95
Trim Size
5x8

Michael McClure

Contemporary American Poet, Playwright, Novelist

What appeals to me most about [McClure’s] poems is the fury and the imagery of them. I love the vividness of his reactions and the very personal turns and swirls of the lines. The worlds in which I myself live, the private world of personal reactions, the biological world (animals and plants and even bacteria chase each other through the poems), the world of the atom and the molecule, the stars and galaxies, are all there: and in between, above and below, stands man, the howling mammal, contrived out of ‘meat’ by chance and necessity.
—Francis Crick