cover image of the book HERmione

Having HERmione back in print makes it possible, therefore, to better read (and teach, and grasp) modernist, lesbian and coming-of-age literature….The 2022 edition retains [H.D.’s] foreword, but brings it into conversation with a compelling afterword by Francesca Wade, who refocuses the text on H. D. and allows the author to speak for herself.

Noreen Masud, TLS

The famously radical portrait of an artist’s life by one of the most celebrated poets of the last century

HERmione

Fictionby Hilda Doolittle (H.D.)

With a contribution by Francesca Wade

This autobiographical novel by the Imagist poet H. D. (1886–1961) is a rare and hallucinatory treasure. In writing HERmione, H. D. returned to a year in her life that was “peculiarly blighted.” She was in her early twenties—“a disappointment to her father, an odd duckling to her mother, an importunate, overgrown, unincarnated entity that had no place.” She had failed at Bryn Mawr, she felt hemmed in by her family, and she did not yet know what she was going to do with her life. The return from Europe of the wild-haired George Lowndes (Ezra Pound) expanded her horizons but threatened her sense of self. An intense new friendship with Fayne Rabb (Frances Josepha Gregg), an odd girl, brought an atmosphere that made our heroine’s hold on everyday reality more tenuous. As Francesca Wade writes in her new introduction, “HERmione is H. D.’s rejoinder to mythic authority: her portrait of an artist groping her way slowly towards self-expression ends with her sexuality and artistic powers awoken, ready to name herself so all the world might know who she is.”

Paperback(published October 4, 2022)

ISBN
9780811222099
Price US
19.95
Trim Size
5x8
Page Count
288

Ebook

ISBN
9780811222334

Paperback(published November 1, 1981)

ISBN
9780811208178
Price US
17.95
Portrait of Hilda Doolittle (H.D.)

Hilda Doolittle (H.D.)

20th century American poet

Having HERmione back in print makes it possible, therefore, to better read (and teach, and grasp) modernist, lesbian and coming-of-age literature….The 2022 edition retains [H.D.’s] foreword, but brings it into conversation with a compelling afterword by Francesca Wade, who refocuses the text on H. D. and allows the author to speak for herself.

Noreen Masud, TLS

As Francesca Wade writes in her excellent afterword, included in New Directions’ recent reissue, the novel, as a piece of early autofiction, is H.D.’s “reckoning,” her search for “a voice” as she rails against the labels and strictures of a world that fails to understand her. I am not an imagist, nor wife, nor daughter, nor muse, HERmione asserts. I am only myself, however mutable or imperfect that self may be.

Ella Fox-Martens, The Baffler

HERmione’s retrospective scavenging and rummaging is a masterpiece…we see an unusually unguarded and even lushly romantic side of H.D., as well as a sense of immediacy and presence in space characteristic of her early poetry. This reprint is a gem for H.D. enthusiasts, but it’s also just a pleasure to read, one of the most inviting and, in the author’s mercy for her younger proxy, most generous of her prose works.

Holly Raymond, The Poetry Project

In some ways, HERmione can be seen as an author’s attempt to rewrite her own genesis, to make her development as a poet a more important story than a christening over tea at the British Museum.

Tyler Malone, Poetry Magazine

H.D. renders the past with hallucinogenic distortion, in pulsing poetic prose. This is a coming-of-age narrative told at a slant, in which people harden into marble statues, and curtains extend for miles in blue diagonals.

Charlie Tyson, The New Yorker

H.D. doesn’t sound modern—she sounds timeless….one of the most riveting stories in American poetry.

Ange Mlinko, The New York Review of Books

The work of an imagination that incorporates boldly the modern consciousness and aesthetic and the traditional, psychoanalytic realism and hermetic visionary experience of a passionate life in its old age.

Robert Duncan

She showed a way to penetrate mystery; which means, not to flood the darkness with light so that darkness is destroyed, but to enter into darkness, mystery, so that it is experienced.

Denise Levertov

H. D’s wit, sense of rhythm, and control of language prove the inadequacy of the imagist label that is so often applied to this writer.

Library Journal