It is like Kafka…Its oddity is like a long, sustained hum, never varying in pitch or volume, that suffuses every page and every line. You open the book up and the hum begins.

—Jason Sheehan, NPR

A breakthrough novel from the acclaimed young American writer

Dog Symphony

Fiction by Sam Munson

Boris Leonidovich, a North American professor who specializes in the history of prison architecture, has been invited to Buenos Aires for an academic conference. He’s planning to present a paper on Moscow’s feared Butyrka prison, but most of all he’s looking forward to seeing his enigmatic, fiercely intelligent colleague (and sometime lover) Ana again. As soon as Boris arrives, however, he encounters obstacle after unlikely obstacle: he can’t get in touch with Ana, he locks himself out of his rented room, and he discovers dog-feeding stations and water bowls set before every house and business. With night approaching, he finds himself lost and alone in a foreign city filled with stray dogs, all flowing with sinister, bewildering purpose through the darkness…

Shadowed with foreboding, and yet alive with the comical mischief of César Aira and the nimble touch of a great stylist, Dog Symphony is an unnerving and propulsive novel by a talented new American voice.

Your Independent Bookstore Barnes & Noble

Paperback (published August 28, 2018)

ISBN
9780811227681
Price US
14.95
Price CN
19.95
Trim Size
5x7"
Page Count
144pp
ISBN
9780811227698

Sam Munson

American writer

It is like Kafka…Its oddity is like a long, sustained hum, never varying in pitch or volume, that suffuses every page and every line. You open the book up and the hum begins.

—Jason Sheehan, NPR

A historian of prison architecture attends a conference in Buenos Aires and gets sucked into a surreal neighborhood patrolled by dogs in this clever novel.

Publishers Weekly (starred review)

A phantasmagoric nightmare.

Kirkus Reviews

Munson is a writer with something to say.

The New York Times Book Review

Sam Munson has written one of the funniest, most heartfelt novels in recent memory

The Chicago Tribune