The Colors of Infamy is more compact and assured than Proud Beggars It doesn’t indulge in as much lyricism as the earlier book, but wrenches even more startling delirium from Egypt’s long years of abjection.

Bookforum

A charming novel about a stylish Cairo pickpocket who gets more than he bargained for

The Colors of Infamy

Fiction by Albert Cossery

Translated from the French by Alyson Waters

Your Independent Bookstore Barnes & Noble

Paperback (published November 23, 2011)

ISBN
9780811217958
Price US
12.95
Price CN
15
Page Count
128

Ebook (published November 23, 2011)

ISBN
9780811221252
Price US
12.95
Page Count
0

Albert Cossery

20th century Egyptian writer

The Colors of Infamy is more compact and assured than Proud Beggars It doesn’t indulge in as much lyricism as the earlier book, but wrenches even more startling delirium from Egypt’s long years of abjection.

Bookforum

Cossery (here and in almost all of his novels) uses thieves, mendicants, and idlers to achieve a form of social otherness through which to examine society as a whole.

The New Inquiry

The heroes of Cossery’s fiction are men who have freed themselves from the Darwinian dictates of work, money, and the struggle for power. They cultivate their gardens on the margins of society, in a cenacle of fraternal spirits: beggars, students, out-of-work actors, and thieves.

—Robyn Creswell, Harper’s