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Yukio Mishima unfolds to English-language readers a fuller range of his talents as he explores a variety of pathways into the complex Japanese personality.

—Robert Trumbull, The New York Times  on Death In Midsummer

The Trace

Fiction by Forrest Gander

The Trace is Forrest Gander’s new masterful, poetic novel about a road trip through Mexico. After a devastating incident involving their adolescent son, a couple embark upon a trip through the vast Chihuahua Desert. They retrace the steps of Ambrose Bierce and try to piece their lives back together. With tender precision, Gander explores the intimacy as they travel through towns and picturesque canyons on a journey through the heart of the Mexican desert. After taking a short-cut through the brutally hot countryside, their car overheats miles from nowhere with terrible consequences. . . .

Available: October 27 2015


Fiction by César Aira

translated by Katherine Silver

One Saturday night a bankrupt bachelor in his sixties and his mother dine with a wealthy friend. They discuss their endlessly connected neighbors. They talk about a mysterious pit that opened up one day, and the old bricklayer who sometimes walked to the cemetery to cheer himself up. Anxious to show off his valuable antiques, the host shows his guests old windup toys and takes them to admire an enormous doll. Back at home, the bachelor decides to watch some late night TV before retiring. The news quickly takes a turn for the worse as, horrified, the newscaster finds herself reporting about the dead rising from their graves, leaving the cemetery, and sucking the blood of the living—all somehow disturbingly reminiscent of the dinner party.

A Cat, A Man, and Two Women

Fiction by Junichiro Tanizaki

translated by Paul McCarthy

The three pieces in this collections—the novella "A Cat, A Man, and Two Women" and two shorter pieces, "The Little Kingdom" and "Professor Rado"—are lighthearted and entertaining variations on one of Tanizaki's favorite preoccupations: dominance and submission in relationships, complicated here by customs, public opinion, and comic grotesqueries.

In the title piece, the bumbling Shozo is caught in the middle of an ongoing struggle between his ex-wife and her younger successor. Shozo would prefer to stay out of it and be peacefully left alone with his elegant tortoiseshell cat, Lily, but he keeps getting dragged back into the battles and arguments. The result is an oddball love triangle centered around Lily, the only true object of Shozo's affections—"one of the finest pieces of literature concerning cats ever written" (Choice).

The Edge of the Horizon

Fiction by Antonio Tabucchi

Antonio Tabucchi’s The Edge of the Horizon is the story of a very unimportant death. Late one night, the body of a young man is delivered to the morgue of an Italian town. The next day’s newspapers report that he was killed in a police raid, and that he went by the obviously false name "Carlo Nobodi." Spino, the morgue attendant on duty at the time, becomes obsessed with tracing the identity of the corpse: "Why do you want to know about him?" asks a local priest. "Because he is dead and I’m alive," replies Spino. Antonio Tabucchi is a master of ambiguity and irony, an Italian writer as subtle as Calvino, as inventive as Eco. In this spare yet densely packed cautionary tale, Tabucchi reminds us (in his Author’s Note) that it is impossible to reach the edge of the horizon since it always recedes before us, but suggests that some people like the philosopher Spinoza (and his namesake Spino) "carry the horizon with them in their eyes."

Mirages of the Mind

Fiction by Mushtaq Ahmed Yousufi

translated by Matt Reeck and Aftab Ahmad

Basharat and his family are Indian Muslims who have relocated to Pakistan, but they remain deeply steeped in the nostalgia of pre-Partition life in India. Through Mirages of the Mind's absurd anecdotes and unforgettable biographical sketches—which hide the deeper unease and sorrow of the family's journey from Kanpur to Karachi—Basharat emerges as a wise fool and the host of this unique sketch comedy. From humorous scenes in colonial north India, to the heartbreak and homesickness of postcolonial life in Pakistan, Mirages of the Mind forms an authentic portrait of life among South Asia's Urdu speakers, rendered beautifully into English by Matt Reeck and Aftab Ahmad.

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