Tawada's stories agitate the mind like songs half-remembered or treasure boxes whose keys are locked within
The New York Times

Yoko Tawada—winner of last year’s National Book Award—presents three terrific new ghost stories, each named after a street in Berlin

Available June 30, 2020

3 Streets

Fiction by Yoko Tawada

Translated by Margaret Mitsutani

The always astonishing Yoko Tawada here takes a walk on the supernatural side of the street. In “Kollwitzstrasse,” as the narrator muses on former East Berlin’s new bourgeois health food stores, so popular with the wealthy young people, a ghost boy begs her to buy him the old-fashioned sweets he craves. She worries that sugar’s still sugar—but why lecture him, since he’s already dead? Then white feathers fall from her head and she seems to be turning into a crane . . . Pure white kittens and a great Russian poet haunt “Majakowskiring”: the narrator who reveres Mayakovsky’s work is delighted to meet his ghost. And finally, in “Pushkin Allee,” a huge Soviet-era memorial of soldiers comes to life—and, “for a scene of carnage everything was awfully well-ordered.” Each of these stories glows, and opens up into new dimensions the work of this magisterial writer.

Editions: ClothboundEbook

Buy from:

Clothbound (published June 30, 2020)

ISBN
9780811229302
Price US
14.95
Trim Size
6.75x9.25
Page Count
64

Ebook

ISBN
9780811229319

Yoko Tawada

Contemporary Japanese-German prose writer

Tawada's stories agitate the mind like songs half-remembered or treasure boxes whose keys are locked within
The New York Times
Tawada's strange, exquisite book toys with ideas of language, identity, and what it means to own someones else's story or one's own.
The New Yorker
Magnificently strange. Tawada is reminiscent of Nikolai Gogol, for whom the natural situation for a ghost story was a minor government employee saving up to buy a fancy coat, the natural destiny of a nose to haunt its owner as an overbearing nobleman.
—Rivka Galchen, New York Times Magazine