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For two decades her work has moved–phrase by phrase, line by line, project by improbable project–in directions that a human brain would never naturally move. The approach has won her awards, accolades, and an electric reputation in the literary world.

—Sam Anderson, The New York Times Magazine

Bakkhai

Theater by Anne Carson


Anne Carson writes, “Euripides was a playwright of the fifth century BC who reinvented Greek tragedy, setting it on a path that leads straight to reality TV. His plays broke all the rules, upended convention and outraged conservative critics. The Bakkhai is his most subversive play, telling the story of a man who cannot admit he would rather live in the skin of a woman, and a god who seems to combine all sexualities into a single ruinous demand for adoration. Dionysos is the god of intoxication. Once you fall under his influence, there is no telling where you will end up."


Available: December 12 2017


Antigonick

Poetry by Anne Carson

translated by Anne Carson

Anne Carson has published translations of the ancient Greek poets Sappho, Simonides, Aiskhylos, Sophokles and Euripides. Antigonick is her seminal work. This paperback edition includes a new preface by the author, “Dear Antigone.” 



The Albertine Workout

Poetry by Anne Carson


The Albertine Workout contains fifty-nine paragraphs, with appendices, summarizing Anne Carson’s research on Albertine, the principal love interest of Marcel in Proust’s Á la recherche du temps perdu.



Nox

Poetry by Anne Carson


Nox is an epitaph in the form of a book, a facsimile of a handmade book Anne Carson wrote and created after the death of her brother. The poem describes coming to terms with his loss through the lens of her translation of "Poem 101" by Catallus "for his brother who died in the Troad." Nox is a work of poetry, but arrives as a fascinating and unique physical object. Carson pasted old letters, family photos, collages and sketches on pages. The poems, typed on a computer, were added to this illustrated "book" creating a visual and reading experience so amazing as to open up our concept of poetry.



Glass, Irony, And God

Poetry by Anne Carson


Anne Carson’s poetry––characterized by various reviewers as "short talks," "essays," or "verse narratives"––combines the confessional and the critical in a voice all her own. Known as a remarkable classicist, Anne Carson in Glass, Irony and God weaves contemporary and ancient poetic strands with stunning style. This collection includes "The Glass Essay," a powerful poem about the end of a love affair, told in the context of Carson’s reading of the Brontë sisters, "Book of Isaiah," which evokes the deeply primitive feel of ancient Judaism, and "The Fall of Rome," about her trip to "find" Rome and her struggle to overcome feelings of terrible alienation there.


Available: November 01 1995


Antigonick

Poetry by Anne Carson

translated by Anne Carson

Anne Carson has published translations of the ancient Greek poets Sappho, Simonides, Aiskhylos, Sophokles and Euripides. Antigonick is her seminal work. This paperback edition includes a new preface by the author, “Dear Antigone.” 



it

Poetry by Inger Christensen

translated by Susanna Nied
with a contribution by Anne Carson

It is the masterwork by Danish poet Inger Christensen ("a true singer of the syllables," said C. D. Wright), often cited as a Nobel contender and one of Europe’s most revered poets. On its publication in 1969, it took Denmark by storm, winning critical praise and becoming a huge popular favorite. Translated into many languages, it won international acclaim and is now a classic of modern Scandinavian poetry. it is both a collection of poems and a single poetic epic, forming a philosophical statement on the nature of language, perception, and reality. The subject matter, though, is down to earth: amoebas, stones, and factories; fear, sea urchins, and mental institutions; sand, sexuality, and song. The words and images of it recur in ways reminiscent of Christensen’s other works, but here is a younger poetry, wilder, and crackling with energy. The marvelous and complex use of mathematical structure in it is faithfully captured in Susanna Nied’s English translation, which won a 2005 PEN Translation Fund Award.